Alice Fordham i
Kainaz Amaria/NPR
Alice Fordham
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Alice Fordham

International Correspondent, Beirut, Lebanon

Alice Fordham is an NPR International Correspondent based in Beirut, Lebanon.

In this role, she reports on Lebanon, Syria and many of the countries throughout the Middle East.

Before joining NPR in 2014, Fordham covered the Middle East for five years, reporting for The Washington Post, the Economist, The Times and other publications. She has worked in wars and political turmoil but also amid beauty, resilience and fun.

In 2011, Fordham was a Stern Fellow at the Washington Post. That same year she won the Next Century Foundation's Breakaway award, in part for an investigation into Iraqi prisons.

Fordham graduated from Cambridge University with a Bachelor of Arts in Classics.

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Iraqi soldiers sit in a truck during a training exercise southeast of Baghdad on Jan. 24. The Iraqi military has made progress against the Islamic State, but the extremist group still holds key cities, and numerous other armed factions operate throughout the country. Karim Kadim/AP hide caption

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Iraqi families displaced from the areas of Hawija and Hamrin in northern Iraq traveled to Kirkuk governorate in search of safety on Aug. 31. Thousands continue to flee ISIS-held areas. Marwan Ibrahim/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Marwan Ibrahim/AFP/Getty Images

A Shiite militia fighter stands in front of a damaged building in Tikrit, Iraq, in April, just days after Islamic State fighters were driven out. Many of the city's Sunni residents have now returned, but the armed Shiite groups remain. For now, the Sunnis and Shiites are mostly getting along. MOHAMMED SAWAF/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption MOHAMMED SAWAF/AFP/Getty Images

Iraqis shop in a Baghdad market back in September. The country is facing severe econoimc problems as the government wages war against ISIS at a time of falling oil revenue. Millions of Iraqis have been driven from their homes, and the country faces huge rebuilding costs in cities damaged by previous fighting. Karim Kadim/AP hide caption

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Parallels

Iraq Faces A Perfect Economic Storm

Iraq's government is waging a costly war with the Islamic State while dealing with falling oil prices, millions of displaced citizens and staggering rebuilding costs.

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Iraqi security forces and allied Sunni tribal fighters evacuate an injured woman after she was shot by the Islamic State in Ramadi on Jan. 4. Iraqi forces have pushed ISIS out of much of Ramadi, but daily fighting is still taking place in the southeast part of the city, where ISIS is using civilians as human shields, according to the Iraqi military. Uncredited/AP hide caption

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In 2014 photo, demonstrators chant pro-ISIS slogans in front of the provincial government headquarters in Mosul, Iraq. AP hide caption

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Safi al-Kasasbeh and his wife Isaaf are the parents of Moath al-Kasasbeh, the Jordanian air force pilot who was captured by the Islamic State in Syria and later killed by the group. Alice Fordham / NPR hide caption

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Radwan Mahmoud, a Syrian refugee, works as a laborer on a construction site in Lebanon. He's supporting 12 family members and earning about $16 a day. With a population of just over 4 million, Lebanon is host to more than 1 million Syrian refugees. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Parallels

As War Drags On, Syrian Refugees In Lebanon Sink Into Debt Trap

Barred from legal work in Lebanon, Syrian refugees are accumulating huge debts as they struggle to pay for rent and other necessities.

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After their villages were overrun by ISIS last year, hundreds of Yazidis sought safety on Mount Sinjar, a place they consider miraculous. Many families, including this one, refuse to leave the mountain. Alison Meuse/NPR hide caption

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Sinjar city, newly freed from ISIS control by U.S.-backed Kurdish forces, lies in ruins. Alison Meuse/NPR hide caption

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