Republican political operative Tyler Harber admitted in federal court to illegally coordinating between a campaign and superPAC. He was sentenced to two years in prison and two years' probation. Neil Conway/flickr Creative Common hide caption

itoggle caption Neil Conway/flickr Creative Common

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush poses with supporters for photos during a fundraiser in May. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Alan Diaz/AP

Doug Hughes said he sees his future as working for "the cause of getting a Congress — not more liberal, not more conservative — but a Congress that is working for the people." Peter Overby/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Peter Overby/NPR

A gyrocopter rests April 15 on the west lawn of the U.S. Capitol in Washington. Doug Hughes, a 61-year-old postal worker from Ruskin, Fla., landed the lightweight helicopter on the Capitol lawn to promote campaign finance reform. He's scheduled to enter pleas to multiple charges Thursday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Candidates, and "un-candidates," for the presidency are slicing and dicing campaign-finance law, testing the boundaries of what's legal. TaxCredits.net via Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption TaxCredits.net via Flickr

"Exploratory" Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush speaks April 17 at the First in the Nation Republican Leadership Conference in Nashua, N.H. His super PAC — Right to Rise — is aiming to raise $100 million dollars by June 1. Brian Snyder/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Brian Snyder/Reuters/Landov