U.S. Army mine-resistant armored vehicles (MRAPs) and Afghan National Army vehicles pass through a village during a joint patrol in the Jalrez Valley in Afghanistan's Wardak province. On Monday, factory workers who produce MRAPs in York, Pa., rallied to protect the Pentagon budget against the automatic budget cuts that will take effect in 2013. Maya Alleruzzo/AP hide caption

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Defense Workers Lobby To Prevent Automatic Cuts

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Gingrich On Defensive Over Freddie Mac Report

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President Richard Nixon faced television cameras in the Oval Office on April 30, 1973 to announce the departure of his two closest assistants in the deepening Watergate scandal. CBS/AP hide caption

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Illegal During Watergate, Unlimited Campaign Donations Now Fair Game

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Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, shown in May speaking at the Georgia Republican Party Victory Dinner in Macon, Ga., says he was acting as a "historian" when Freddie Mac paid him consultant fees of $300,000. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Did Freddie Mac Pay Newt Gingrich $300,000?

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GOP Says Obama Supporter Pushed For Solyndra Loan

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Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain speaks at a dinner in April sponsored by Americans for Prosperity in Manchester, N.H. Cain has close ties to the group, founded by billionaire businessmen David and Charles Koch. Jim Cole/AP hide caption

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Cain Has Long Ties To Koch Brothers-Linked Group

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Nonprofit Seeks To Be New Political Force

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UPS was among the top scorers in a new index ranking companies on political transparency and accountability.

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More Corporations Shed Light On Political Spending

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Occupy D.C. Learns To Like The Tea Party

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Texas Gov. Rick Perry saw his fundraising numbers plummet after his September debate performances.

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Financial Reports Shed Little Light On GOP Race

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Can Obama Campaign Reignite Small Donors' Passion

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New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie turns to leave a news conference at the Statehouse in Trenton on Tuesday after he announced that he will not run for president in 2012.

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