The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health sent a mobile testing unit to a fire station in Wharton, W.Va., in 2012 to screen coal miners for black lung disease. Howard Berkes/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Howard Berkes/NPR

Spike In Black Lung Cases Strains Federal Benefits Program

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/505892933/505892934" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Branham wears reflective mining pants in his home in Elkhorn City, Ky. Branham has advanced stage black lung and was forced to quit mining earlier this year. Benny Becker/Ohio Valley ReSource hide caption

toggle caption
Benny Becker/Ohio Valley ReSource

Advanced Black Lung Cases Surge In Appalachia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/505577680/505751356" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

West Virginia billionaire businessman Jim Justice announced his run for governor of West Virginia as a Democrat in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., on May 11, 2015. Chris Tilley/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Tilley/AP

Investigators Shift Focus To Dallas Police Shooter's Military Service

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/486208779/486208783" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rachel Jenkins outside her home in Boley, Okla. Jenkins settled her case with ResCare, who denied her medical benefits and lost pay after she injured her shoulder at work. Nick Oxford hide caption

toggle caption
Nick Oxford

Labor Secretary Thomas Perez, pictured in 2015, says, "If you get hurt on [the] job, you still should be able to put food on the table, and these laws are really undermining that basic bargain." Molly Riley/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Molly Riley/AP

Bob Ebeling with his daughter Kathy (center) and his wife, Darlene. Howard Berkes/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Howard Berkes/NPR

Challenger Engineer Who Warned Of Shuttle Disaster Dies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/470870426/471467074" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Bob Ebeling, now 89, at his home in Brigham City, Utah. Howard Berkes/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Howard Berkes/NPR

Your Letters Helped Challenger Shuttle Engineer Shed 30 Years Of Guilt

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/466555217/468149502" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

(Left) Bob Ebeling in his home in Brigham City, Utah. (Right) The Challenger lifts off on Jan. 28, 1986, from a launchpad at Kennedy Space Center, 73 seconds before an explosion killed its crew of seven. (Left) Howard Berkes/NPR; (Right) Bob Pearson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
(Left) Howard Berkes/NPR; (Right) Bob Pearson/AFP/Getty Images

30 Years After Explosion, Challenger Engineer Still Blames Himself

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/464744781/464768261" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After 21 years as a building engineer for Macy's department stores, Kevin Schiller was left unable to work as the result of a 2010 workplace accident. Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR

Federal Workplace Law Fails To Protect Employees Left Out Of Workers' Comp

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/460257932/463789797" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript