Rachel Jenkins outside her home in Boley, Okla. Jenkins settled her case with ResCare, who denied her medical benefits and lost pay after she injured her shoulder at work. Nick Oxford hide caption

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Labor Secretary Thomas Perez, pictured in 2015, says, "If you get hurt on [the] job, you still should be able to put food on the table, and these laws are really undermining that basic bargain." Molly Riley/AP hide caption

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Bob Ebeling with his daughter Kathy (center) and his wife, Darlene. Howard Berkes/NPR hide caption

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Challenger Engineer Who Warned Of Shuttle Disaster Dies
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Bob Ebeling, now 89, at his home in Brigham City, Utah. Howard Berkes/NPR hide caption

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Your Letters Helped Challenger Shuttle Engineer Shed 30 Years Of Guilt
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(Left) Bob Ebeling in his home in Brigham City, Utah. (Right) The Challenger lifts off on Jan. 28, 1986, from a launchpad at Kennedy Space Center, 73 seconds before an explosion killed its crew of seven. (Left) Howard Berkes/NPR; (Right) Bob Pearson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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30 Years After Explosion, Challenger Engineer Still Blames Himself
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After 21 years as a building engineer for Macy's department stores, Kevin Schiller was left unable to work as the result of a 2010 workplace accident. Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR hide caption

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Federal Workplace Law Fails To Protect Employees Left Out Of Workers' Comp
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When Businesses Opt Out Of Workers' Comp, Employees May Struggle For Care
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Joe Becker at his home in Abilene, Texas. Nearly two years after hurting his back at work, his benefits have stopped even though he's still in pain and in need of another surgery. Dylan Hollingsworth for ProPublica hide caption

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Opt-Out Plans Let Companies Work Without Workers' Comp
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Feds Probe Failure To Collect Mine Safety Penalties After NPR Report
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Businessman Jim Justice announces he's running for governor of West Virginia. Federal regulators say that as of March he hadn't paid more than $2 million in fines for safety violations in his coal mines. Chris Tilley/AP hide caption

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John Coffell sits at his grandmother's table in Hulen, Okla. An injury at a tire plant last year left him unable to work. Brett Deering for ProPublica/AP hide caption

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