Scott Horsley 2010 i
Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

White House Correspondent

Scott Horsley is a White House correspondent for NPR News. He reports on the policy and politics of the Obama Administration, with a special emphasis on economic issues.

The 2012 campaign is the third presidential contest Horsley has covered for NPR. He previously reported on Senator John McCain's White House bid in 2008 and Senator John Kerry's campaign in 2004. Thanks to this experience, Horsley has become an expert in the motel shampoo offerings of various battleground states.

Horsley took up the White House beat after serving as a San Diego-based business correspondent for NPR where he covered fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley was a reporter for member station KPBS-FM, where he received numerous honors, including a Public Radio News Directors' award for coverage of the California energy crisis.

Earlier in his career, Horsley worked as a reporter for WUSF-FM in Tampa, Florida, and as a news writer and reporter for commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University.

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Congress tries every year to plug a loophole that would otherwise result in a 21 percent cut in Medicare doctors' pay. But it doesn't exactly always tighten its belt in the process. Key Wilde/Getty Images hide caption

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Maranda Brooks stands in January outside a payday loans business that she used to frequent. Troubled by consumer complaints and loopholes in state laws, federal regulators are proposing expansive, first-ever rules on payday lenders, aimed at helping cash-strapped borrowers from falling into a cycle of debt. Tony Dejak/AP hide caption

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President Obama views solar panels on the roof of the Department of Energy with Deputy Secretary Liz Sherwood-Randall, second from right, Federal Chief Sustainability Officer Kate Brandt, right, and Energy Manager Eric Haukdal, left. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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President Obama takes questions from the audience Wednesday after speaking about the economy and the middle class to the City Club of Cleveland. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Republican Rep. Tom Price, House Budget Committee chairman, said Tuesday that his budget "saves $5.5 trillion, gets to balance within 10 years, without raising taxes." Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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President Obama is shown in the Oval Office in the White House March 3, where he spoke about yet another topic: Iran and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's speech to Congress. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Jacquelyn Martin/AP

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton checks her mobile phone in March 2012 after her address to the Security Council at United Nations headquarters. While she's asked the State Department to quickly release her emails from her tenure as secretary, the process likely will take months — dragging out media coverage and critical questions. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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