Geoff Brumfiel

Science Correspondent

Science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel's reports on physics, space, and all things nuclear can be heard across NPR News programs and on NPR.org.

Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk. He became a full-time correspondent in March of 2013.

Prior to NPR, Geoff was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. In addition to reporting, he was a member of the award-winning Nature podcast team. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent, reporting on Congress, the Bush administration, NASA, and the National Science Foundation, as well as the Departments of Energy and Defense.

He began his journalism career working on the American Physical Society's "Focus" website, which is now part of Physics.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

He graduated from Grinnell College with a BA double degree in physics and English, and earned his Masters in science writing from Johns Hopkins University.

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A giant cluster of about 3,000 stars called Westerlund 2. The cluster resides in a raucous stellar breeding ground known as Gum 29, located 20,000 light-years away in the constellation Carina. NASA, ESA, STScI/AURA hide caption

itoggle caption NASA, ESA, STScI/AURA

A direct, friendly gaze seems to help cement the bond of affection between people and their pooches. Dan Perez/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Dan Perez/Flickr

Not many students have the cutting-edge cybersecurity skills the NSA needs, recruiters say. And these days industry is paying top dollar for talent. Brooks Kraft/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Brooks Kraft/Corbis

Saturn has a rocky surface, but it's deep beneath the clouds. That makes it hard to tell exactly how long the day is. NASA hide caption

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Workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory used organic cat litter to clean up nuclear waste. The litter triggered chemical reactions that later caused a drum to burst. Department of Energy/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Department of Energy/Flickr

New research suggests that Saturn's tiny moon Enceladus has warm oceans hiding beneath its icy crust. NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute hide caption

itoggle caption NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Climate skeptic Willie Soon has argued in the past that too much ice is bad for polar bears. An investigation into Soon's funding found he took money from the fossil fuel industry and did not always disclose that source. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

Astronomers have known about Ceres for centuries, but they don't really know what to make of it. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA hide caption

itoggle caption Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Who, me? The Asian relative of this domestic gerbil is a well-known host to the bacteria that cause plague. Valentina Storti/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Valentina Storti/Flickr

Botanists say this plant is the fern equivalent of a human-lemur love child. Harry Roskam hide caption

itoggle caption Harry Roskam

To put their probes into the Arctic Ice, researchers hitched a ride on a South Korean icebreaker. Courtesy of Craig M. Lee/University of Washington hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Craig M. Lee/University of Washington