Geoff Brumfiel

Science Editor

Science editor Geoff Brumfiel oversees coverage of everything from butterflies to black holes across NPR News programs and on NPR.org.

Prior to becoming the editor for fundamental research news in April of 2016, Brumfiel worked for three years as a reporter covering physics and space. Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk.

Before NPR, Brumfiel was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. In addition to reporting, he was a member of the award-winning Nature podcast team. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent, reporting on Congress, the Bush administration, NASA, and the National Science Foundation, as well as the Departments of Energy and Defense.

He began his journalism career working on the American Physical Society's "Focus" website, which is now part of Physics.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

He graduated from Grinnell College with a BA double degree in physics and English, and earned his Masters in science writing from Johns Hopkins University.

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Story Archive

The North Korean Electromagnetic Pulse Threat, Or Lack Thereof

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A scene from the 1990s Sci-Fi film Timecop, featuring Jean-Claude Van Damme (left). Ronald Siemoneit/Sygma via Getty Images hide caption

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Ronald Siemoneit/Sygma via Getty Images

It Sounds Like Science Fiction But ... It's A Cliché

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This photo, made available by SpaceX Thursday, shows the company's Falcon 9 rocket launching from Kennedy Space Center's historic Pad 39A in Cape Canaveral, Fla. SpaceX hide caption

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SpaceX

SpaceX Reuses A Rocket To Launch A Satellite

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Scott Pruitt's comments on carbon dioxide come just over two weeks after he took the helm of the Environmental Protection Agency, the agency with the authority to regulate CO2 and other greenhouse gases as pollutants. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

A Reddit subgroup has been busy discussing the benefits of eating oranges in the shower. We asked three NPR journalists to investigate whether the act is as life-changing as some people claim. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Do Showers Make Oranges Taste Better? NPR Investigates

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An instructor at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., carries VX nerve agent inside a special chamber used for training in 2003. Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images

VX: The Nerve Agent Used To Kill Kim Jong Nam Is Rare And Deadly

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EPA Scientists' Work May Be Subject To Review By Trump Team

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U.S. Report Confirms 2016 Was The Hottest Year On Record

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North Korean leader Kim Jong Un looks at a warhead component being developed for a ballistic missile, at an unidentified location in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency on March 15, 2016. KCNA/Reuters hide caption

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KCNA/Reuters

Search For Answers In Missing Malaysia Flight Continues

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Russia's new Iskander system can be armed with nuclear warheads and can fire either ballistic (pictured) or cruise missiles. The Iskander-M missile launcher was used during a military exercise last month by the Russian Eastern Military District's 5th army at a firing range in Ussuriysk, Russia. Yuri Smityuk/TASS via Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Smityuk/TASS via Getty Images

When in a playful mood, rats like a gentle tickle as much as the next guy, researchers find. Shimpei Ishiyama and Michael Brecht/Science hide caption

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Shimpei Ishiyama and Michael Brecht/Science