Geoff Brumfiel

Science Editor

Science editor Geoff Brumfiel oversees coverage of everything from butterflies to black holes across NPR News programs and on NPR.org.

Prior to becoming the editor for fundamental research news in April of 2016, Brumfiel worked for three years as a reporter covering physics and space. Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk.

Before NPR, Brumfiel was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. In addition to reporting, he was a member of the award-winning Nature podcast team. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent, reporting on Congress, the Bush administration, NASA, and the National Science Foundation, as well as the Departments of Energy and Defense.

He began his journalism career working on the American Physical Society's "Focus" website, which is now part of Physics.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

He graduated from Grinnell College with a BA double degree in physics and English, and earned his Masters in science writing from Johns Hopkins University.

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Lasers and mirrors are used to carefully measure shifts in space-time. To avoid contamination, protective clothing must be worn at all times. LIGO Lab/Caltech/MIT hide caption

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How To Catch The Biggest Wave In The Universe

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The Joint European Torus, a European fusion project in the U.K., gets most of its funding from the EU. Brexit may change that, and the even larger ITER fusion project. EUROfusion hide caption

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The black holes were 14 and 8 times the mass of the sun. As they spiraled together, they sent out gravitational waves. LIGO/T. Pyle hide caption

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Gravitational Waves From Colliding Black Holes Shake Scientists' Detectors Again

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Environment and Public Works Committee Chairman Sen. James Inhofe, R-Okla., speaks with Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., on Thursday before joining a bipartisan group of senators at a Capitol Hill news conference to discuss legislation to improve the federal regulation of chemicals and toxic substances. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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In Polluted India, Negative Ion Necklaces Vow To Help You Breathe Easier

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Geophysicists announced this week that they have successfully collected key samples from the site of the asteroid strike that likely wiped out the dinosaurs. Joe Tucciarone/Science Source hide caption

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Geologists Find Clues In Crater Left By Dinosaur-Killing Asteroid

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The Large Hadron Collider uses superconducting magnets to smash sub-atomic particles together at enormous energies. CERN hide caption

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Weasel Apparently Shuts Down World's Most Powerful Particle Collider

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Stephen Hawking discusses the "Breakthrough Starshot" space exploration initiative during a news conference Tuesday at One World Observatory in New York City. Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for Breakthrough Prize Foundation hide caption

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Stephen Hawking's Plan For Interstellar Travel Has Some Earthly Obstacles

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Ambitious Project Would Use 'Starchips' To Travel To Alpha Centauri

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SpaceX Rocket Sticks The Landing After Resupply Mission

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