Geoff Brumfiel Science editor Geoff Brumfiel oversees coverage of everything from butterflies to black holes across NPR News programs and on NPR.org.

Geoff Brumfiel

Science Editor

Science editor Geoff Brumfiel oversees coverage of everything from butterflies to black holes across NPR News programs and on NPR.org.

Prior to becoming the editor for fundamental research news in April of 2016, Brumfiel worked for three years as a reporter covering physics and space. Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk.

Before NPR, Brumfiel was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. In addition to reporting, he was a member of the award-winning Nature podcast team. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent, reporting on Congress, the Bush administration, NASA, and the National Science Foundation, as well as the Departments of Energy and Defense.

He began his journalism career working on the American Physical Society's "Focus" website, which is now part of Physics.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

He graduated from Grinnell College with a BA double degree in physics and English, and earned his Masters in science writing from Johns Hopkins University.

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Carhenge lies in the path of totality for the Aug. 21 eclipse. Christian Heeb/Getty Images hide caption

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Christian Heeb/Getty Images

As Eclipse Madness Sweeps U.S., A Stonehenge Made Of Cars Prepares

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Trump Claims To Have Modernized The U.S. Nuclear Arsenal

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Morning News Brief: North Korea's Nuclear Threat, Trump TV

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North Korea Has Miniaturized A Nuclear Warhead, U.S. Intelligence Says

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Participants look at a world map showing climate anomalies during the World Climate Change Conference 2015 in France. A draft government report on climate, which was released by The New York Times ahead of publication, says the U.S. is already experiencing the consequences of global warming. Stephane Mahe/Reuters hide caption

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Stephane Mahe/Reuters

The massive crack first opened up in the Larsen C ice shelf back in 2014; by the end of last week, a roughly 3-mile sliver of ice was all that connected the iceberg to the shelf. John Sonntag/NASA hide caption

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John Sonntag/NASA

Massive Iceberg Breaks Free In Antarctica

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Isabel Seliger for NPR

Total Failure: The World's Worst Video Game

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Total Failure: When The Space Shuttle Didn't Come Home

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The North Korean Electromagnetic Pulse Threat, Or Lack Thereof

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A scene from the 1990s Sci-Fi film Timecop, featuring Jean-Claude Van Damme (left). Ronald Siemoneit/Sygma via Getty Images hide caption

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Ronald Siemoneit/Sygma via Getty Images

It Sounds Like Science Fiction But ... It's A Cliché

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This photo, made available by SpaceX Thursday, shows the company's Falcon 9 rocket launching from Kennedy Space Center's historic Pad 39A in Cape Canaveral, Fla. SpaceX hide caption

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SpaceX

SpaceX Reuses A Rocket To Launch A Satellite

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Scott Pruitt's comments on carbon dioxide come just over two weeks after he took the helm of the Environmental Protection Agency, the agency with the authority to regulate CO2 and other greenhouse gases as pollutants. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP