Geoff Brumfiel

Science Editor

Science editor Geoff Brumfiel oversees coverage of everything from butterflies to black holes across NPR News programs and on NPR.org.

Prior to becoming the editor for fundamental research news in April of 2016, Brumfiel worked for three years as a reporter covering physics and space. Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk.

Before NPR, Brumfiel was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. In addition to reporting, he was a member of the award-winning Nature podcast team. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent, reporting on Congress, the Bush administration, NASA, and the National Science Foundation, as well as the Departments of Energy and Defense.

He began his journalism career working on the American Physical Society's "Focus" website, which is now part of Physics.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

He graduated from Grinnell College with a BA double degree in physics and English, and earned his Masters in science writing from Johns Hopkins University.

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The Large Hadron Collider uses superconducting magnets to smash sub-atomic particles together at enormous energies. CERN hide caption

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Weasel Apparently Shuts Down World's Most Powerful Particle Collider
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Stephen Hawking discusses the "Breakthrough Starshot" space exploration initiative during a news conference Tuesday at One World Observatory in New York City. Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for Breakthrough Prize Foundation hide caption

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Stephen Hawking's Plan For Interstellar Travel Has Some Earthly Obstacles
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Ambitious Project Would Use 'Starchips' To Travel To Alpha Centauri
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An undated picture provided by the official Korean Central News Agency earlier this month shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un talking with scientists and technicians. North Korea's nuclear warhead was jokingly dubbed "the disco ball," but experts say the spherical device, while likely a model, is probably based on a real nuclear weapons design. KCNA/EPA via Corbis hide caption

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Why Analysts Aren't Laughing At These Silly North Korean Photos
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A Tokyo Electric Power Co. staffer measures the radiation level as others work on the construction of an ice wall at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant on July 9, 2014. Kimmimasa Mayama/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Water, Soil And Radiation: Why Fukushima Will Take Decades To Clean Up
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South Korean Go champion Lee Sedol (right) poses with Google DeepMind head Demis Hassabis. On Wednesday, Sedol will begin a five-match series against a computer. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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How Google's Neural Network Hopes To Beat A 'Go' World Champion
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U.S. astronaut Scott Kelly shows a victory sign after landing safely on Earth after nearly a year in space. Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Astronauts Back Home After A Year In Space
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Kelly posted this photo of an aurora taken from the International Space Station to Twitter on Aug. 15, 2015. NASA hide caption

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Scott Kelly Reflects On His Year Off The Planet
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NASA astronaut Scott Kelly takes a selfie inside the cupola, a special module that provides a 360-degree view of Earth. Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko have spent nearly a year aboard the International Space Station. NASA hide caption

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Navigation aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Stout is done by computer, as is the case on many other ships. The U.S. Navy now wants more of its officers proficient in celestial navigation. Amanda Gray/U.S. Navy hide caption

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U.S. Navy Brings Back Navigation By The Stars For Officers
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An image from a simulation of two black holes merging. Courtesy of SXS Collaboration hide caption

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Einstein, A Hunch And Decades Of Work: How Scientists Found Gravitational Waves
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