Geoff Brumfiel

Science Correspondent

Science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel's reports on physics, space, and all things nuclear can be heard across NPR News programs and on NPR.org.

Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk. He became a full-time correspondent in March of 2013.

Prior to NPR, Geoff was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. In addition to reporting, he was a member of the award-winning Nature podcast team. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent, reporting on Congress, the Bush administration, NASA, and the National Science Foundation, as well as the Departments of Energy and Defense.

He began his journalism career working on the American Physical Society's "Focus" website, which is now part of Physics.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

He graduated from Grinnell College with a BA double degree in physics and English, and earned his Masters in science writing from Johns Hopkins University.

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A NASA team has attached nearly all of the hexagonal segments that will together make the primary mirror for the James Webb Space Telescope (pictured are practice segments). Chris Gunn/NASA hide caption

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The stomach of Oetzi, who was mummified in ice, was home to bacteria that scientists were able to identify. The same species lives in the gut of many modern humans. EURAC/Marion Lafogler hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Stomach Of Ancient Iceman Held Microbes Like Ours

Scientists analyzed the tummy of a 5,300-year-old ice mummy and found bacteria that many modern humans still carry.

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Castle Romeo was an American hydrogen bomb test in March 1954 at Bikini Atoll in the Pacific. It was 11 megatons, or roughly 1,000 times more powerful than North Korea's test on Wednesday. North Korea says it was a hydrogen bomb test, though the White House says it doubts the claim. Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty Images hide caption

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Parallels

The U.S. Isn't Buying North Korea's Claim Of An H-Bomb Test

North Korea says it detonated a powerful hydrogen bomb on Wednesday. But the White House says it doesn't believe the claim.

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Iran's President Hassan Rouhani visited the Bushehr nuclear power plant in January. Iran has always insisted that its nuclear program is for civilian purposes. But a new report by the International Atomic Energy Agency says that Iran had a nuclear weapons program until 2003. Mohammad Berno/Iranian Presidency Office via AP hide caption

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The new object is one of many dwarf planets orbiting at the edge of the solar system. This artist's conception shows the previous record-holder for distance, a dwarf planet called Eris. ESO/L. Calçada hide caption

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The Two-Way

Astronomers Spot Most Distant Object So Far In The Solar System

A random search has turned up a dwarf planet orbiting roughly 10 billion miles away. The far-off world is tiny, and probably very, very cold.

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Solar storms from the sun send charged particles streaming towards Mars. Research now shows those particles are stripping away the atmosphere. NASA/GSFC hide caption

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The Two-Way

Researchers Reveal How Climate Change Killed Mars

Mars used to be much warmer and wetter than it is today. Scientists are unraveling the mystery of why it dried out.

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The STAR detector used in the antimatter experiment is the size of a house. It's able to track particles created when atoms collide at its center. BNL/STAR Collaboration hide caption

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The Two-Way

Physicists Probe Antimatter For Clues To How It All Began

Physicists don't know why there's more matter than antimatter in our universe. New research smashed together atoms of pure gold to look for clues.

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This false-color image of Enceladus shows so-called "tiger stripes" across the moon's icy surface. Researchers believe the stripes are caused by an ocean beneath the ice. NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute hide caption

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The Two-Way

NASA Spacecraft To Skim Past Saturn's Icy Moon

The Cassini probe will pass within just 30 miles of Saturn's moon Enceladus. The goal is to search for signs of habitability.

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This image shows Hurricane Patricia, a Category 5 storm, blasting toward southwestern Mexico on Friday. The photo was taken from the International Space Station. Scott Kelly/AP hide caption

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Inside a nondescript building at Los Alamos National Laboratory known as TA-66, nuclear weapons inspectors are carefully trained in the detection of plutonium. Courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory hide caption

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Science

How Do You Find Plutonium? Go To Nuclear Inspector School

A nuclear agreement with Iran hinges on the work of nuclear inspectors. Here's a close-up look at how they train to do their job.

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