Geoff Brumfiel

Science Correspondent

Science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel's reports on physics, space, and all things nuclear can be heard across NPR News programs and on NPR.org.

Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk. He became a full-time correspondent in March of 2013.

Prior to NPR, Geoff was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. In addition to reporting, he was a member of the award-winning Nature podcast team. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent, reporting on Congress, the Bush administration, NASA, and the National Science Foundation, as well as the Departments of Energy and Defense.

He began his journalism career working on the American Physical Society's "Focus" website, which is now part of Physics.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

He graduated from Grinnell College with a BA double degree in physics and English, and earned his Masters in science writing from Johns Hopkins University.

[+] full biography[-] full biography

An aerial view of Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, on March 11. Kyodo/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Kyodo/Reuters/Landov

Common marmosets can copy the sounds and intonations of their parents. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

It took astronauts 33 days to grow enough red romaine lettuce to make a small salad. NASA hide caption

itoggle caption NASA

U.S. strategists wanted to flatten an entire city with a single atomic bomb: Hiroshima was the right size. AP hide caption

itoggle caption AP

Star Trek's Mr. Spock and Captain Kirk never even lose pocket change when they use a transporter to get from TV's Starship Enterprise to distant worlds. What gives? Paramount Television/The Kobal Collection hide caption

itoggle caption Paramount Television/The Kobal Collection

Artist's concept compares Earth (left) to the new planet, called Kepler-452b, which is about 60 percent larger in diameter. NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle hide caption

itoggle caption NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle