Adam Frank

Blogger, 13.7: Cosmos & Culture

Adam Frank is a contributor to the NPR blog 13.7: Cosmos & Culture. A professor at the University of Rochester, Frank is a theoretical/computational astrophysicist and currently heads a research group developing supercomputer code to study the formation and death of stars. Frank's research has also explored the evolution of newly born planets and the structure of clouds in the interstellar medium. Recently, he has begun work in the fields of astrobiology and network theory/data science. Frank also holds a joint appointment at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, a Department of Energy fusion lab.

Frank is the author of two books: The Constant Fire, Beyond the Science vs. Religion Debate (University of California Press, 2010), which was one of SEED magazine's "Best Picks of The Year," and About Time, Cosmology and Culture at the Twilight of the Big Bang (Free Press, 2011). He has contributed to The New York Times and magazines such as Discover, Scientific American and Tricycle.

Frank's work has also appeared in The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2009. In 1999 he was awarded an American Astronomical Society prize for his science writing.

More from Adam Frank

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An artist imagines what the surface of the planet Proxima b, orbiting the red dwarf star Proxima Centauri, might look like. M. Kornmesser/ESO/NASA hide caption

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Why The Discovery Of An Earth-Like Planet Is Such A Big Deal

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In the Integration Facility at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmembers (left to right) Kate Rubins of NASA, Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency prepared for a four-month mission on the International Space Station in this June 2016 photo. Alexander Vysotsky/NASA hide caption

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Short Answers To Big Questions: The Power Of Earth's Magnetic Field

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Short Answers To Big Questions: Exploring Atoms In Space

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Earth as seen by the Expedition 47 crew on May 31, 2016, from the International Space Station — looking from northwestern China on the bottom into eastern Kazakhstan. The large lake in Kazakhstan with golden sun glint is the crescent-shaped Lake Balkhash, the second largest lake in Central Asia. NASA hide caption

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