Colin Marshall/NPR
Adam Cole 2017
Colin Marshall/NPR

Adam Cole

Reporter, Science Desk

Adam Cole is a reporter and producer for the Science Desk, where he creates short documentary videos, radio pieces, animations, musical podcast segments, data visualizations, and GIFs about science. In 2014, Cole launched Skunk Bear, a visual science blog and YouTube channel that has built a robust audience on social media: Skunk Bear's videos have been viewed more than 9 million times.

Cole came to NPR as an editorial intern for the Science Desk in January 2011, and was then hired to stay on as a production assistant from 2011 to 2012.

He got his start in journalism at The Ferndale Enterprise, a small but mighty local weekly paper in Northern California. Before that, he worked as a research scientist, studying the genetics of pancreatic cancer and the physics of mussel beds.

Cole has won and been nominated for various awards, including Webbys and Vimeo awards, WHNPA awards for Multimedia Feature and Multimedia Linear Storytelling, a second place Best of Photojournalism 2015 award, a first place National Association of Black Journalists Salute To Excellence 2014 award for Digital Media: Feature Story, two Best American Infographics awards, and an EPPY award.

He currently serves as an instructor with Johns Hopkins University's Master of Arts in Science Writing program.

Cole received a Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences from Stanford University, and a Master of Science in Biology from Stanford University.

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Why Does A Frozen Lake Sound Like A Star Wars Blaster?

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Maia Stern, Adam Cole/NPR

Watch Earth's History Play Out On A Football Field

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Ryan Kellman/NPR's Skunk Bear

Trace The Remarkable History Of The Humble Pencil

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Father And Daughter Circumnavigate The Globe Using A Mental Compass

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Think wasps all look alike? Look again. Courtesy of Elizabeth Tibbetts hide caption

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Courtesy of Elizabeth Tibbetts

Our 'Golden Mole' Winner Used To Paint Wasps For A Living

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Alchemist Hennig Brand looks focused, if maybe a bit drained, in this 1795 painting by Joseph Wright. The painting depicts Brand's discovery of the chemical element phosphorus. Joseph Wright of Derby/Wikimedia hide caption

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Joseph Wright of Derby/Wikimedia

Phosphorus Starts With Pee In This Tale Of Scientific Serendipity

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