Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.
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Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

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Story Archive

Police and forensic experts inspect the wreckage of a car bomb believed to have killed journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia close to her home in Bidnija, Malta, on Monday. The force of the blast broke her car into several pieces, witnesses said. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Poet Richard Wilbur, shown at his home in Cummington, Mass., in 2006, died on Saturday at the age of 96. Wilbur, a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and translator, intrigued and delighted generations of readers and theatergoers through his rhyming editions of Moliere and his own verse on memory, writing and nature. Nancy Palmieri/AP hide caption

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Nancy Palmieri/AP

Richard Wilbur Reads 'The Opposite Of Pillow'

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Snails Senda (left), Jara, Tomeau, Jeremy and Indi hang out together at the University of Nottingham's labs. Jeremy was the lab's original sinistral snail; the others are his "Spanish pals," as scientist Angus Davison puts it. Angus Davison/University of Nottingham hide caption

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Angus Davison/University of Nottingham

An undated photo provided by the Buncombe County Detention Center shows Michael Christopher Estes, who is accused of planting an improvised explosive device at the Asheville Regional Airport in North Carolina on Oct. 6. AP hide caption

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Photographer Leo Reynolds snapped a picture of this "666" in 2013. Leo Reynolds/Flickr hide caption

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Leo Reynolds/Flickr

Korva teaches us how to say paraskevidekatriaphobia

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Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy speaks at the Spanish parliament in Madrid on Wednesday. Rajoy has asked Catalan leader Carles Puigdemont to confirm whether he has declared independence. Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images hide caption

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Researchers collect a sample at the Werdhölzli wastewater treatment plant in Zurich, as part of an Eawag research project exploring the concentration of various metals in treated wastewater. Elke Suess/Eawag hide caption

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Elke Suess/Eawag

Supporters of Catalan independence wave Catalan flags as they drive with tractors through the Arc de Triomf in Barcelona on Tuesday. Jorge Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Fearless Girl statue was commissioned by State Street Corporation to raise awareness about "gender diversity" in corporate leadership. The company is paying $5 million after investigators concluded it underpaid female and black employees. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Tourists walk past a restaurant, closed in preparation for hurricane Irma, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on Sept. 7. The Bureau of Labor Statistics says a drop in U.S. jobs in September was likely reflecting the impact of hurricanes on workers — particularly restaurant employees who aren't paid if they aren't on the job. Michele Eve Sandberg/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A woman sits underneath a balloon, carrying the logo of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, in Paris on August 7, 2017. Activists were holding a four-day hunger strike calling for France to sign the ICAN-supported treaty to ban nuclear weapons. The group has now won the Nobel Peace Prize. Stephane De Sakutin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephane De Sakutin/AFP/Getty Images

International Campaign To Abolish Nuclear Weapons Wins 2017 Nobel Peace Prize

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Crowley shipping containers with running refrigeration systems are lined up at in the port of San Juan, Puerto Rico. They've been there for days, goods locked away inside. Angel Valentin for NPR hide caption

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Angel Valentin for NPR

In Puerto Rico, Containers Full Of Goods Sit Undistributed At Ports

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