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Greg Myre 2016
Barry Morgenstein/NPR

Greg Myre

National Security Correspondent

Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism, a topic he has covered in the U.S., the Middle East and in many other countries around the world for more than two decades.

He was previously the international editor for NPR.org, working closely with NPR correspondents around the world and national security reporters in Washington. He heads the Parallels blog and is a frequent contributor to the website on global affairs. Prior to his current position, he was a senior editor at Morning Edition from 2008-2011.

Before joining NPR, Myre was a foreign correspondent for 20 years with The New York Times and The Associated Press.

He was first posted to South Africa in 1987, where he witnessed Nelson Mandela's release from prison and reported on the final years of apartheid. He was assigned to Pakistan in 1993 and often traveled to war-torn Afghanistan. He was one of the first reporters to interview members of an obscure new group calling itself the Taliban.

Myre was also posted to Cyprus and worked throughout the Middle East, including extended trips to Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. He went to Moscow from 1996 to 1999, covering the early days of Vladimir Putin.

He was based in Jerusalem from 2000-2007, reporting on the heaviest fighting ever between Israelis and the Palestinians.

In his years abroad, he traveled to more than 50 countries and reported on a dozen wars. He and his journalist wife Jennifer Griffin co-wrote a 2011 book on their time in Jerusalem, entitled, This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

Myre is a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington and has appeared as an analyst on CNN, PBS, BBC, C-SPAN, Fox, Al Jazeera and other networks. He's a graduate of Yale University, where he played football and basketball.

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Story Archive

Michael Flynn (with his hand to his ear) sits next to Russian President Vladimir Putin at a dinner in Moscow on Dec. 10, 2015, celebrating the 10th anniversary of RT, an English-language TV channel funded by the Russian government. Mikhail Klimentyev/AP hide caption

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Mikhail Klimentyev/AP

Michael Flynn's Contradictory Line On Russia

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Ex-National Security Adviser Michael Flynn Embroiled In Russia Controversy

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President Trump meets Saudi Arabia's Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the Oval Office on March 14. Trump is traveling to the kingdom Friday on his first foreign trip. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

President Trump's First Foreign Trip Will Include Red-Carpet Welcome In Saudi Arabia

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Morning News Brief: Trump's Request To Comey And Sharing Intelligence With Russia

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News Brief: Trump Accused Of Sharing Classified Data, Iran Election Preview

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South African President F.W. de Klerk and Nelson Mandela jointly received the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, Norway, in 1993 for negotiating an end to apartheid. Earlier that year, de Klerk announced that South Africa had dismantled six nuclear weapons, becoming to first country to get rid of nuclear bombs that it had built. Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images

Giving Up Nuclear Weapons: It's Rare, But It's Happened

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Afghan warlord Gulbuddin Hekmatyar speaks in eastern Afghanistan on Saturday. A prominent figure for decades in Afghanistan's war, Hekmatyar, 69, was known as the "Butcher of Kabul" when his forces rocketed the city in the 1990s. He made peace with the government and President Ashraf Ghani welcomed him back to the capital on Thursday. Mohammad Anwar Danishyar/AP hide caption

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Mohammad Anwar Danishyar/AP

The 'Butcher Of Kabul' Is Welcomed Back In Kabul

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As ISIS Loses Ground, Returning Fighters Create A New Worry

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A statue of the Greek writer Thucydides sits outside the Austrian capital in Vienna. More than 2,000 years ago, he noted the friction that led to war between an established power, Sparta, and a rising power, Athens. A new book by Harvard professor Graham Allison makes a comparison with the relationship between the U.S. and China. vladacanon/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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vladacanon/Getty Images/iStockphoto

From Ancient Greece, Lessons On The Risk Of A Modern, Accidental War

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U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, pictured in Moscow last week, says Iran has been abiding by a 2015 nuclear agreement. But he told Congress in a letter that the Trump administration was reviewing the lifting of U.S. sanctions against Iran to determine if that was in U.S. interests. Ivan Sekretarev/AP hide caption

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Ivan Sekretarev/AP

Trump's National Security Strategy Empowers Military Commanders

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Russian President Vladimir Putin meets President George W. Bush at the G-8 economic summit in Genoa, Italy on July 22, 2001. The leaders initially had a good relationship. But shortly before Bush left office, he told Putin, "Vladimir, you're cold-blooded." Luke Frazza/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Frazza/AFP/Getty Images

A still from a video released by the U.S. Navy on Thursday evening shows the guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) as it conducts strike operations while in the Mediterranean Sea. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ford Williams hide caption

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U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ford Williams

Trump Revises Rhetoric On Islamic Terrorism In Remarks With Middle East Allies

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Gen. John "Black Jack" Pershing visits Arlington National Cemetery in 1925. Pershing led the U.S. forces in World War I, the moment when the American military first displayed its might in a major foreign war. The U.S. military suffered heavy losses, but it also expanded dramatically, modernized and became more professional under Pershing's command. Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

At A Hefty Cost, World War I Made The U.S. A Major Military Power

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