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Lead water pipes are still used in many U.S. homes. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

Lead Levels Below EPA Limits Can Still Impact Your Health

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Katherine Du for NPR

Where Lead Lurks And Why Even Small Amounts Matter

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Navy veteran Amanda Wirtz looks through her correspondence with the Veterans Choice program. After the VA couldn't get her an appointment with a specialist, it sent her to the Choice program. But she still was unable to get an appointment for several months. Courtesy of KPBS hide caption

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Courtesy of KPBS

How Congress And The VA Left Many Veterans Without A 'Choice'

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People paddle past a flooded house as water that breached dams upstream continues to reach the eastern part of the state on October 8, 2015 in Andrews, S.C. Many dams in the state — and across the country — are in need of repair. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

We finally found this simple, traditional radio at Radioshack — though they are also available, in abundance, online. Emily Jan/NPR hide caption

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Emily Jan/NPR

Finding A 'Radio That Is Just A Radio' In The Digital Age

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kcline/iStockphoto.com

School Lunch Debate: What's At Stake?

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Mark Karney found the recipe for his mother's Hungarian nut roll in a dusty recipe box after she passed away. After lots of experimentation, he figured out how to make it and has revived it as a Christmas tradition. Courtesy of Mark Karney hide caption

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Courtesy of Mark Karney

Why We Hold Tight To Our Family's Holiday Food Traditions

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In 1939, Montgomery Ward in Chicago asked one of its admen to write a story for the department store's own children's book. Rauner Special Collections Library/Dartmouth College hide caption

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Rauner Special Collections Library/Dartmouth College

Writing 'Rudolph': The Original Red-Nosed Manuscript

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The FBI and Department of Justice are working to encourage local law enforcement agencies to view child prostitutes as potential human trafficking victims rather than criminals. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Feds Recast Child Prostitutes As Victims, Not Criminals

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