Lulu Miller - 2014
John Poole/NPR
Lulu Miller - 2014
John Poole/NPR

Lulu Miller

Co-Host, Invisibilia

Lulu Miller is co-host of the NPR program Invisibilia.

Miller covers stories that challenge our assumptions about how the human organism works—from the story of The "Bat Man" (a man who is blind and uses echolocation to navigate the world), to the tale of Martin Pistorius (who was locked in his body for 13 years but found a way to emerge), to a surprising new way to overcome your demons, by, well, lying to yourself.

She is always on the hunt for "stories in which Duct-Tape Solves the Ethereal Sadness," as she puts it. To hear more about that, take a listen here. In January 2015, Miller and NPR Science Correspondent Alix Spiegel created Invisibilia, a series from NPR about the unseen forces that control human behavior – our ideas, beliefs, assumptions, and thoughts. Invisibilia interweaves personal stories and fascinating new psychological and brain science in a way that, ultimately, makes you see your own life differently. The radio program is available in podcast form and excerpts are featured on All Things Considered and Morning Edition. Before that, she was a reporter on the NPR Science Desk.

Prior to joining NPR in 2013, Miller taught and wrote fiction at the University of Virginia on a Poe-Faulkner Fellowship. Before that, she was with Radiolab, working as one of the founding producers on the weekly public radio show and podcast that weaves stories and science into sound and music-rich documentaries. Radiolab is produced by WNYC. Miller produced Radiolab for five years and continues to serve as a contributor. Her work has been recognized by the George Foster Peabody Awards, Third Coast, and The Missouri Review.

Miller graduated from Swarthmore College with a degree in History.

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Can You Psych Yourself Into Running A 4-Minute Mile?

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Can A Computer Change The Essence Of Who You Are?

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Residents of ShantiNiketan, a retirement community near Orlando, Fla., walk in a Hindu religious procession. Courtesy of ShantiNiketan Inc. hide caption

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Being With People Like You Offers Comfort Against Death's Chill

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A Blind Woman Gains New Freedom, Click By Click By Click

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Martin Pistorius sometime between 1990 and 1994, when he was unable to communicate. Courtesy of Martin Pistorius hide caption

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Trapped In His Body For 12 Years, A Man Breaks Free

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The Blind Woman Who Sees Rain, But Not Her Daughter's Smile

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Contagious Aphrodisiac? Virus Makes Crickets Have More Sex

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Editing Your Life's Stories Can Create Happier Endings

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Could a countdown to death help you lead a more ecstatic life? Daniel Horowitz for NPR hide caption

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Nothing Focuses The Mind Like The Ultimate Deadline: Death

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The Juliet Club (Club di Giulietta) mailbox in Verona, Italy. Volunteers answer by hand every single letter that the club receives. Courtesy of the Juliet Club hide caption

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Letters Of Heartbreak Find Some Love In Verona, Italy

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