Michaeleen Doucleff

Michaeleen Doucleff is a digital editor for NPR's Science Desk. She is the deputy host for the global health and development blog, Goats and Soda, and she reports for the Web and radio on disease outbreaks and trends in global health.

As a science journalist, Doucleff has reported on a broad range of topics, from vaccination fears and the microbiome to beer biophysics and dog psychology.

Before coming to NPR in 2012, Doucleff was an editor at the journal Cell, where she wrote about the science behind pop culture. Doucleff has a doctorate in chemistry from the University of Berkeley, California, and a master's degree in viticulture and enology from the University of California, Davis.

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These are insect cells infected with the Guaico Culex virus. The different colors denote cells infected with different pieces of the virus. Only the brown-colored cells are infectious, because they contain the complete virus. Michael Lindquist/Cell Press hide caption

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Twin girls born with extremely small heads, shrunken spinal cords and extra folds of skin around the skull. Scientists think this skin forms when the skull collapses onto itself after the brain —€” but not the skull —€” stops growing. The images of the girls' heads were constructed on the computer using CT scans taken shortly after birth. The girls were infected with Zika at 9 weeks gestation. Courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America hide caption

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A plane sprays pesticide over the Wynwood neighborhood of Miami on Aug. 6. That's just one way health officials are battling back Zika-carrying mosquitoes in the area. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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How Big, Really, Is The Zika Outbreak In Florida?

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The Old World hookworm is an intestinal parasite. The image above was taken by a scanning electron micrograph and was color-enhanced. The worm's actual size ranges from 0.03 inches to 0.3 inches. David Scharf/Science Source hide caption

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Could Worms In Your Gut Cure Your Allergies?

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Why The World Isn't Close To Eradicating Guinea Worm

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A family near the Siberian city of Salekhard. A heat wave is blamed for thawing a 75-year-old reindeer carcass, along with dormant spores of anthrax bacteria that infected it. Sergey Anisimov/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthrax Outbreak In Russia Thought To Be Result Of Thawing Permafrost

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Vanessa Gomez (left) with her son Ezra, 2, and her friend Cristy Fernandez with her 9-month-old-son River, in the Wynwood neighborhood of Miami. At least 14 people likely caught Zika from mosquitoes in the neighborhood, health officials say. Gomez calls that news "scary," but adds, "we cannot stop living our lives." Marta Lavandier/AP hide caption

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With Zika in Miami, What Should Pregnant Women Across The U.S. Do?

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Woman holding the dapivirine vaginal ring. Andrew Loxley/International Partnership for Microbicides hide caption

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The HIV Trap: A Woman's Lack Of Control

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Katie Park/NPR

Zika Epidemic May Have Peaked But Will Threaten U.S. For Years

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Why Back Pain Is Nearly Non-Existent In Some Populations

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Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in a lab in Recife, Brazil. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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How An Electric Shock Could One Day Protect You From Zika

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