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Michaeleen Doucleff 2016
Sanjit Das/NPR

Michaeleen Doucleff

Reporter, Science Desk

Michaeleen Doucleff is a reporter for NPR's Science Desk. She reports for the radio and the Web for NPR's global health and development blog, Goats and Soda. Doucleff focuses on disease outbreaks, drug development, and trends in global health.

In 2014, Doucleff was part of the team that earned a George Foster Peabody award for its coverage of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. For the series, Doucleff reported on how the epidemic ravaged maternal health and how the virus spreads through the air. In 2015, Doucleff and Senior Producer Jane Greenhalgh reported on the extreme prejudices faced by young women in Nepal when they're menstruating. Their story was the second most popular one on the NPR website in 2015 and contributed to the NPR series on 15-year-old girls around the world, which won two Gracie Awards.

As a science journalist, Doucleff has reported on a broad range of topics, from vaccination fears and the microbiome to beer biophysics and dog psychology.

Before coming to NPR in 2012, Doucleff was an editor at the journal Cell, where she wrote about the science behind pop culture. Doucleff has a doctorate in chemistry from the University of Berkeley, California, and a master's degree in viticulture and enology from the University of California, Davis.

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Clara Sunderland was recently born in southern California. Her mom, Wendy, says a breast-feeding support group on Facebook has been crucial to learning how to breast-feed. Courtesy of Wendy Sunderland hide caption

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Courtesy of Wendy Sunderland

German and Cameroonian kids were part of an experiment based on the classic "marshmallow test": Put a single treat before a child but tell the child if he or she waits, say, 10 minutes, a second treat will be given. Nathalie Dieterle for NPR hide caption

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Nathalie Dieterle for NPR

Want To Teach Your Kids Self-Control? Ask A Cameroonian Farmer

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San Francisco lactation counselor Caroline Kerhervé — with kids of her clients — during a weekly session of a new mothers' group she coached in May. Courtesy of Caroline Kerherve hide caption

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Courtesy of Caroline Kerherve

(From left) Mothers from Namibia's Himba tribe; from Amber, India; and from Washington state. Jose Luis Trisan/Getty; Hadynyah/Getty; Sarah Wolfe Photography/Getty hide caption

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Jose Luis Trisan/Getty; Hadynyah/Getty; Sarah Wolfe Photography/Getty

Secrets Of Breast-Feeding From Global Moms In The Know

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What Women Should Keep In Mind When They're Thinking Of Breast-Feeding

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Spillover Beasts: Which Animals Pose The Biggest Viral Risk?

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"In college, I would tell my friends that I wanted to pursue a Ph.D., and they would chuckle and ridicule the idea," says Eqbal Dauqan, who is an assistant professor at the University Kebangsaan Malaysia at age 36. Born and raised in Yemen, Dauqan credits her "naughty" spirit for her success in a male-dominated culture. Sanjit Das for NPR hide caption

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Sanjit Das for NPR

She May Be The Most Unstoppable Scientist In The World

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When the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lifted its last Zika travel advisory for Miami-Dade County last week, residents and visitors to Miami's popular South Beach neighborhood were relieved. Still, doctors say, pregnant women should continue to take extra precautions. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Pregnant women — and those trying to get pregnant — should not travel to places where the Zika virus is circulating. For children, age is a factor. Alessandro Abel/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Alessandro Abel/Getty Images/EyeEm

Is Zika Dangerous For Kids? It Probably Depends On The Age

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A depiction of Clostridium botulinum, the bacteria that create a deadly toxin. The preformed toxin can be found in home-canned foods and some retail products, such as canned cheese, chili sauces and oil infused with garlic. Jennifer Oosthuizen/CDC hide caption

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Jennifer Oosthuizen/CDC

Heading someplace where you could get traveler's diarrhea? Try packing some prophylactic pills containing bismuth subsalicylate, such as Pepto Bismol. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Tips For Staying Healthy When Traveling Abroad

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This is a screenshot of an online promotion by LensCulture for the Magnum 2017 photo competition, using photographs by Souvid Datta taken of girls in the red light district of Kolkata. The photo that was used has been blacked out. LensCulture/Courtesy of DuckRabbit hide caption

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LensCulture/Courtesy of DuckRabbit

Outcry Over Photo Showing The Face Of A Girl Allegedly Being Raped

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