Michaeleen Doucleff Michaeleen Doucleff is a reporter for NPR's Science Desk.
Sanjit Das/NPR
Michaeleen Doucleff 2016
Sanjit Das/NPR

Michaeleen Doucleff

Reporter, Science Desk

Michaeleen Doucleff is a reporter for NPR's Science Desk. She reports for the radio and the Web for NPR's global health and development blog, Goats and Soda. Doucleff focuses on disease outbreaks, drug development, and trends in global health.

In 2014, Doucleff was part of the team that earned a George Foster Peabody award for its coverage of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. For the series, Doucleff reported on how the epidemic ravaged maternal health and how the virus spreads through the air. In 2015, Doucleff and Senior Producer Jane Greenhalgh reported on the extreme prejudices faced by young women in Nepal when they're menstruating. Their story was the second most popular one on the NPR website in 2015 and contributed to the NPR series on 15-year-old girls around the world, which won two Gracie Awards.

As a science journalist, Doucleff has reported on a broad range of topics, from vaccination fears and the microbiome to beer biophysics and dog psychology.

Before coming to NPR in 2012, Doucleff was an editor at the journal Cell, where she wrote about the science behind pop culture. Doucleff has a doctorate in chemistry from the University of Berkeley, California, and a master's degree in viticulture and enology from the University of California, Davis.

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Advocates Highlight Foreign Aid's Success Stories Amid Talk Of Cuts

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For the first time, scientists have carefully analyzed all the critters in a kitchen sponge. There turns out to be a huge number. Despite recent news reports, there is something you can do about it. Joy Ho for NPR hide caption

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Joy Ho for NPR

So Your Kitchen Sponge Is A Bacteria Hotbed. Here's What To Do

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A patient with the H7N9 avian flu is treated in a hospital in Wuhan, in central China's Hubei province, in February of this year. The 2017 outbreak was the deadliest in China since H7N9 first appeared in humans in 2013. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The typical asymmetrical lymphedema (lower limb swelling) seen in podoconiosis. The skin on the affected limbs is thickened with warty and mossy nodules. The toes are disfigured with joint fixation typical of advanced podoconiosis disease. Christine Kihembo/ASTMH & AJTMH hide caption

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Christine Kihembo/ASTMH & AJTMH

Hadza man eating honeycomb and larvae from a beehive. Matthieu Paley/National Geographic hide caption

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Matthieu Paley/National Geographic

Is The Secret To A Healthier Microbiome Hidden In The Hadza Diet?

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Vanessa Wauchope begins abdominal exercises in Leah Keller's class in San Francisco, Calif. Keller teaches an exercise, called "drawing in," to help strengthen abdominal muscles that tend to spread apart a bit during pregnancy. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

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Matt Twombly for NPR

Probiotic Bacteria Could Protect Newborns From Deadly Infection

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Women work on strengthening their core abdominal muscles in Leah Keller's exercise class for new moms, inside a San Francisco clothing store called Monkei Miles. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

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Talia Herman for NPR

Flattening The 'Mummy Tummy' With 1 Exercise, 10 Minutes A Day

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Clara Sunderland was recently born in southern California. Her mom, Wendy, says a breast-feeding support group on Facebook has been crucial to learning how to breast-feed. Courtesy of Wendy Sunderland hide caption

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Courtesy of Wendy Sunderland

German and Cameroonian kids were part of an experiment based on the classic "marshmallow test": Put a single treat before a child but tell the child if he or she waits, say, 10 minutes, a second treat will be given. Nathalie Dieterle for NPR hide caption

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Nathalie Dieterle for NPR

Want To Teach Your Kids Self-Control? Ask A Cameroonian Farmer

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