Nathan Rott

Reporter, National Desk

Nathan Rott is a reporter on NPR's National Desk.

Based at NPR West in Culver City, California, Rott spends a lot of his time on the road, covering everything from breaking news stories like the terrorist attacks in San Bernardino to in-depth issues like the future of our national parks. Though his reporting takes him around the country, Rott's primary focus and interest is the ever-changing face of the American West. Whether it's the effects of warmer waters in the Pacific Ocean, the changing demographics of rural towns, or the plight of the prairie chicken, Rott tries to tell the stories of the people that live, breathe, and work in the American West and portray the issues that are important to them.

Rott owes his start at NPR to two extraordinary young men he never met. As the first recipient of the Stone and Holt Weeks Fellowship in 2010, he aims to honor the memory of the two brothers by carrying on their legacy of making the world a better place.

As a Montanan and graduate of the University of Montana, Rott prefers to be outside at just about every hour of the day. Prior to working at NPR, he worked a variety of jobs including wildland firefighting, commercial fishing, children's theater teaching, and professional snow-shoveling for the United States Antarctic Program. Odds are, he's shoveled more snow than you.

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Story Archive

A shark swims off the coast of Midway Atoll on the northern edge of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument in Hawaii. The Trump administration plans to consider reversing the designation of some marine sanctuaries. Wyland/NOAA/AP hide caption

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Wyland/NOAA/AP

Trump To Sign Executive Order On Offshore Drilling And Marine Sanctuaries

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This is mountain lion kitten known as P-54 found in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area. It is the only known kitten from P-23's third litter, according to the National Park Service. Courtesy of the National Park Service hide caption

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Courtesy of the National Park Service

A Mountain Lion Kitten Is Found, Leading To Excitement And Concern

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The Call-In: Answering Your Questions About Trump And Climate Change

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Trump Signs Executive Order Rolling Back Regulation On Carbon Emissions

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EPA Chief: Trump Plans To Kill Obama-era Clean Power Plan

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Legislation would loosen restrictions on gun suppressors, with proponents saying quieter guns protect shooters' hearing. But opponents say easier-to-get silencers are a risk to the public. Niki Chan Wylie for NPR hide caption

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Niki Chan Wylie for NPR

Debate Over Silencers: Hearing Protection Or Public Safety Threat?

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EPA Head Scott Pruitt Doubts Basic Consensus On Climate Change

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Trump Orders Review Of Obama-Era Clean Water Rule

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Senate Confirms Scott Pruitt To Lead Environmental Protection Agency

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William Ruckelshaus is sworn in as administrator of the new Environmental Protection Agency as President Richard Nixon looks on at the White House on Dec. 4, 1970. Charles Tasnadi/AP hide caption

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Charles Tasnadi/AP

How The EPA Became A Victim Of Its Own Success

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Protestors On Both Sides Of Trump's Immigration Ban Meet At Los Angeles Airport

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GOP Lawmakers Take Steps To Repeal Environmental Regulations

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Doug Ericksen, a Washington state senator who is the head of communications for the Trump administration's EPA transition team, listens to testimony during a hearing in Olympia, Wash., in 2013. Rachel La Corte/AP hide caption

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Rachel La Corte/AP