Corey Seeholzer/NPR
Sam Sanders 2017
Corey Seeholzer/NPR

Sam Sanders

Reporter and Podcast Host

Sam Sanders is a reporter and podcast host at NPR. Most recently, as a key member of NPR's election unit, Sam covered the intersection of culture, pop culture, and politics in the 2016 election, and embedded with the Bernie Sanders campaign for several months. He was also one of the original cohosts of NPR's Politics Podcast, which launched in 2015.

Now Sam is hard at work on a new project: a news and pop culture podcast for NPR, set to launch in 2017.

Sanders joined NPR in 2009 as a Kroc Fellow, and since then has worn many hats within the organization, including field producer and breaking news reporter. He's spent time at three Member stations as well: WUNC in North Carolina, Oregon Public Broadcasting, and WBUR in Boston, as an intern for On Point with Tom Ashbrook.

Sanders graduated from the Harvard Kennedy School in 2009 with a Master's degree in public policy, with a focus on media and politics. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio Texas with a double major in political science and music.

In his free time, Sanders runs, eats bacon, discusses the tortured genius of Kanye West, and continues his love/hate relationship with Twitter.

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Story Archive

This March 28, 2017, photo shows Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich., leaving a closed-door strategy session on Capitol Hill. A top aide to President Donald Trump urged the primary defeat of Amash in a tweet. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

What Is The Hatch Act? And What Does It Mean For Government Employees And Twitter?

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Is A Tweet Partisan Political Activity? Did Scavino's Tweet Violate Hatch Act?

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It is time for us to assess the pros and cons of the tweetstorm, the thread, the whatever and figure out just what it all means. diego_cervo/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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diego_cervo/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Groups Behind Trump Resistance Look To Use Recent Windfall Wisely

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A Reddit subgroup has been busy discussing the benefits of eating oranges in the shower. We asked three NPR journalists to investigate whether the act is as life-changing as some people claim. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Do Showers Make Oranges Taste Better? NPR Investigates

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The Washington Post and other media organizations have launched webpages outlining ways you can leak information to them confidentially. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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How The Media Are Using Encryption Tools To Collect Anonymous Tips

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A woman holds up her cellphone before a rally with then presidential candidate Donald Trump in Bedford, N.H., in September. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Is Donald Trump Helping Or Hurting Twitter?

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Despite Getting Attention Via Trump, Twitter Falling Short For Investors

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President Trump gives a thumbs up as he speaks on the phone in the Oval Office on Jan. 29. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Is Trump Tweeting From a 'Secure' Smartphone? The White House Won't Say

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Barbershop: 2016 Is Almost Over, But Was It Really The Worst?

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Large portions of the Internet have declared 2016 one of the worst years ever. But 2017 hasn't gotten here yet, so let's all just simmer down. Luciano Lozano/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks July 16 in New York City. The president-elect's Twitter habit could run up against cybersecurity recommendations once he's in office — but he may also choose to disregard that advice to keep his direct channel to the public open. Bryan Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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What Will Trump's Twitter Strategy Be When He Becomes President?

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