Sam Sanders Sam Sanders is a reporter and host of It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders.
Corey Seeholzer/NPR
Sam Sanders 2017
Corey Seeholzer/NPR

Sam Sanders

Host, It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

Sam Sanders is a reporter and host of It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders at NPR. In the show, Sanders engages with journalists, actors, musicians, and listeners to gain the kind of understanding about news and popular culture that can only be reached through conversation. The podcast releases two episodes each week: a "deep dive" interview on Tuesdays, as well as a Friday wrap of the week's news.

Previously, as a key member of NPR's election unit, Sam covered the intersection of culture, pop culture, and politics in the 2016 election, and embedded with the Bernie Sanders campaign for several months. He was also one of the original cohosts of NPR's Politics Podcast, which launched in 2015.

Sanders joined NPR in 2009 as a Kroc Fellow, and since then has worn many hats within the organization, including field producer and breaking news reporter. He's spent time at three Member stations as well: WUNC in North Carolina, Oregon Public Broadcasting, and WBUR in Boston, as an intern for On Point with Tom Ashbrook.

Sanders graduated from the Harvard Kennedy School in 2009 with a Master's degree in public policy, with a focus on media and politics. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio Texas with a double major in political science and music.

In his free time, Sanders runs, eats bacon, discusses the tortured genius of Kanye West, and continues his love/hate relationship with Twitter.

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Story Archive

White House aide Omarosa Manigault speaks to a health care panel in June. On Friday, she was part of a panel at a black journalists conference that ended with the audience protesting her participation. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Border Angels Protect Migrants Crossing Into The U.S. From Mexico

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Eli Pariser, CEO of Upworthy, speaks onstage at during the 2014 SXSW Festival in Austin, Texas. At its peak, the site, which is founded on a mission of promoting viral and uplifting content, was reaching close to 90 million people a month. Jon Shapley/Getty Images for SXSW hide caption

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Upworthy Was One Of The Hottest Sites Ever. You Won't Believe What Happened Next

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In his new special, Klepper tries to focus on activists who are working to reduce gun violence. Matt Salacuse/Comedy Central hide caption

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Listen to Jordan Klepper's interview with NPR:

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Andrew Knight holds a sign of Pepe the frog, an alt-right icon, during a rally in Berkeley, Calif., on April 27. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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What Pepe The Frog's Death Can Teach Us About The Internet

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This March 28, 2017, photo shows Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich., leaving a closed-door strategy session on Capitol Hill. A top aide to President Donald Trump urged the primary defeat of Amash in a tweet. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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What Is The Hatch Act? And What Does It Mean For Government Employees And Twitter?

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Is A Tweet Partisan Political Activity? Did Scavino's Tweet Violate Hatch Act?

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It is time for us to assess the pros and cons of the tweetstorm, the thread, the whatever and figure out just what it all means. diego_cervo/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Groups Behind Trump Resistance Look To Use Recent Windfall Wisely

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A Reddit subgroup has been busy discussing the benefits of eating oranges in the shower. We asked three NPR journalists to investigate whether the act is as life-changing as some people claim. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Do Showers Make Oranges Taste Better? NPR Investigates

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The Washington Post and other media organizations have launched webpages outlining ways you can leak information to them confidentially. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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How The Media Are Using Encryption Tools To Collect Anonymous Tips

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