Cory Turner - 2014 i
Stephen Voss/NPR
Cory Turner - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Cory Turner

Senior Editor, NPR Ed

Cory Turner edits and reports for the NPR Ed Team. He's led the team's coverage of the Common Core while also finding time for his passion: exploring how kids learn — in the classroom, on the playground, at home and everywhere else.

Before coming to NPR Ed, Cory was Senior Editor of All Things Considered. There he worked closely with the staff and hosts to make sure the right questions were asked of the right people at the right time. As the show's editor, Cory was its narrative custodian: story architect, correction czar, copy writer and polisher, guardian of the show's "voice," and the person by the phone when the hosts had an emergency question.

Before coming to NPR, Cory lived in Los Angeles and, hoping for a way in to public radio, answered phones at the network's Culver City studios. In 2004, a two-week temporary assignment booking for The Tavis Smiley Show led to regular work on NPR News with Tony Cox and News & Notes with Ed Gordon. In 2007, he won two Salute to Excellence Awards from the National Association of Black Journalists.

In 2000, Cory earned a master's in screenwriting from the University of Southern California's School of Cinematic Arts. There he wrote a short film that has seen more of the world than he has, ultimately screening at the Sundance Film Festival and selling to HBO. He also wrote a feature film for Magnolia Pictures.

You can reach him at dcturner@npr.org.

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Is There A Better Way To Pay For America's Schools?
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Source: Education Week, U.S. Census Bureau Alyson Hurt and Katie Park/NPR hide caption

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Why America's Schools Have A Money Problem
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Why Science Teachers Are Struggling With Climate Change
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Workers "sling" the last remaining shark cast from the original Jaws mold and lift it, by crane, to a nearby crate. After spending more than 25 years at a Los Angeles junkyard, "Bruce" is headed for a museum. Todd Wawrychuk/Courtesy of AMPAS hide caption

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From Junkyard To Museum: The Journey Of A 'Jaws' Shark
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Department Of Education Creates Student Aid Enforcement Office
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Katerina Maylock teaches a college test preparation class at Holton Arms School in Bethesda, Md. The current version of the SAT college entrance exam is having its final run, when thousands of students nationwide will sit, squirm or stress through the nearly four-hour reading, writing and math test. A new revamped version debuts in March. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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A History Of The SAT In 4 Questions
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How A Great Teacher Cultivates Veggies (And Kids) In The Bronx — In 17 Photos
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