Elissa Nadworny Elissa Nadworny reports and edits for the NPR Ed Team.
Ariel Zambelich/NPR
Elissa Nadworny
Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Elissa Nadworny

Editor, NPR Ed

Elissa Nadworny reports and edits for the NPR Ed Team. She's led the team's multiplatform strategy – incorporating radio, print, comics, and multimedia into the coverage of education. In 2017, she was part of the NPR Ed team that won a Murrow Award for excellence in innovation. As a reporter, she's covered many education topics including new education research, chronic absenteeism, college access for low-income students, and the changing demographics of higher ed.

After the 2016 election she traveled with Melissa Block across the U.S., for the Our Land series. They reported from communities small and large, capturing how people's identity is shaped by where they live.

Prior to coming to NPR, Nadworny worked at Bloomberg News, reporting on the White House. For Bloomberg, she's covered stories on immigration, Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's return to the U.S. and the president's health. You can still occasionally catch her reporting from 1600 Penn on the weekends.

A recipient of the McCormick National Security Journalism Scholarship, she spent four months reporting a story about U.S. international food aid for USA Today, traveling to Jordan to report on food programs for Syrian refugees. In addition to USA Today, she's written stories for Dow Jones' MarketWatch, the Chicago Tribune, the Miami Herald and McClatchy DC.

A native of Erie, Pennsylvania, Nadworny has a bachelor's degree in documentary film from Skidmore College and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Residents handle aftermath of hurricane with resilience, humor and spirit. Jaylyn Rosario stands on makeshift barrier to prevent flooding of her home on Avenida Esteves, piled high with sand and debris washed in from a creek. Carol Guzy for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Carol Guzy for NPR

Wilfredo Gonzalez (right), plays guitar during Sunday's service. The church's board president, Gonzalez lost three sisters in a landslide during the hurricane. Carol Guzy for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Carol Guzy for NPR

Antonio Santamaria (from left), Emilia Rubalcaba, Veronica Segredo, Louis Perez and Olivia Geller. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Miami 4th-Graders Write About Their Experiences With Hurricanes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/552296582/552418344" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scott Collins and his family returned to the southern edge of Marathon Key to find their home devastated. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elissa Nadworny/NPR

PHOTOS: Keys Residents Face Devastated Homes, No Power And A Slow Recovery

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/552034346/552047950" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Nancy and Christian Schneider live in the Holly Lake Mobile Home park, where they haven't had electricity in their home since Hurricane Irma struck Florida over a week ago. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Students perform in The Little Mermaid, the sixth-most popular musical in the 2016-2017 school year. R. Bruhn /Courtesy of Educational Theatre Association hide caption

toggle caption
R. Bruhn /Courtesy of Educational Theatre Association
Sam Octigan for NPR

In The Weeks Before Freshman Year, Money Worries Aplenty

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542574774/549098334" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Ryan Johnson for NPR

What You Should Know About The New Summer SAT

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542043992/546186330" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alex Williams (right) trains younger cadets to sky-dive. Williams started at the Air Force Academy at what he calls "the young but old age of 20" after serving in an Air Force honor guard for two years. Tom Kimmell/Courtesy of The Hechinger Report hide caption

toggle caption
Tom Kimmell/Courtesy of The Hechinger Report

An Air Force Cadet At 25: A Sign Of The Times In Higher Education

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542311107/545901925" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript