'Heat' Stroke: The genius of this buddy-cop comedy is in its pairing of Sandra Bullock (left, as a by-the-book process nerd of an FBI suit) with Melissa McCarthy, who plays a sloppy Boston detective with no patience for procedure. Gemma La Mana/Fox hide caption

itoggle caption Gemma La Mana/Fox

Gerry Lane (Brad Pitt) puts his past as a U.N. investigator to work again when he and his family — not to mention the rest of the planet — are threatened by a zombie apocalypse. Paramount Pictures hide caption

itoggle caption Paramount Pictures

The 1939 film The Wizard Of Oz was rated G. The 2013 film Oz the Great and Powerful was rated PG. The difference? Maybe a little violence and a womanizing leading man. AP/Walt Disney Pictures hide caption

itoggle caption AP/Walt Disney Pictures

Still Talking: After 18 years, Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Celine (Julie Delpy) apparently have plenty left to hash out. Despina Spyrou/Sony Pictures Classics hide caption

itoggle caption Despina Spyrou/Sony Pictures Classics

A young Sarah Polley and her actor father, Michael Polley, on a long-ago day; the photo is one of many family memories that surface in Stories We Tell, a superb meditation on dramatizing memory from the director of Away from Her. Roadside Attractions hide caption

itoggle caption Roadside Attractions

Light It Up: Director Baz Luhrmann (right, with stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Carey Mulligan on the set of The Great Gatsby) brought a lush visual sensibility to a tale whose tone not everyone thinks of as epic. Matt Hart/Warner Bros. Pictures hide caption

itoggle caption Matt Hart/Warner Bros. Pictures

The Broadway musical Matilda put NPR's Bob Mondello in mind of two other big-budget tuners with plucky kids at the center of the action — and got him thinking about what these shows say about their eras. Joan Marcus hide caption

itoggle caption Joan Marcus

Veteran magician Ricky Jay reveals much about himself in a new documentary on his life of deception. His card-trick techniques? That may be another story. Kino Lorber hide caption

itoggle caption Kino Lorber

The paying and collecting of taxes might not be the sexiest plot point in an industry that depends on sizzle. But that doesn't mean revenuers haven't made their mark on screen. Airyelf/iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption Airyelf/iStockphoto.com

Brooklyn Dodgers first baseman Jackie Robinson (Chadwick Boseman) acknowledges the crowd in 42. Warner Bros hide caption

itoggle caption Warner Bros