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Neda_Ulaby
Doby Photography/NPR

Neda Ulaby

Reporter, Arts Desk

Neda Ulaby reports on arts, entertainment, and cultural trends for NPR's Arts Desk.

Scouring the various and often overlapping worlds of art, music, television, film, new media and literature, Ulaby's radio and online stories reflect political and economic realities, cultural issues, obsessions and transitions, as well as artistic adventurousness— and awesomeness.

Over the last few years, Ulaby has strengthened NPR's television coverage both in terms of programming and industry coverage and profiled breakout artists such as Ellen Page and Skylar Grey and behind-the-scenes tastemakers ranging from super producer Timbaland to James Schamus, CEO of Focus Features. Her stories have included a series on women record producers, an investigation into exhibitions of plastinated human bodies, and a look at the legacy of gay activist Harvey Milk. Her profiles have brought listeners into the worlds of such performers as Tyler Perry, Ryan Seacrest, Mark Ruffalo, and Courtney Love.

Ulaby has earned multiple fellowships at the Getty Arts Journalism Program at USC Annenberg as well as a fellowship at the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism to study youth culture. In addition, Ulaby's weekly podcast of NPR's best arts stories. Culturetopia, won a Gracie award from the Alliance for Women in Media Foundation.

Joining NPR in 2000, Ulaby was recruited through NPR's Next Generation Radio, and landed a temporary position on the cultural desk as an editorial assistant. She started reporting regularly, augmenting her work with arts coverage for D.C.'s Washington City Paper.

Before coming to NPR, Ulaby worked as managing editor of Chicago's Windy City Times and co-hosted a local radio program, What's Coming Out at the Movies. Her film reviews and academic articles have been published across the country and internationally. For a time, she edited fiction for The Chicago Review and served on the editing staff of the leading academic journal Critical Inquiry. Ulaby taught classes in the humanities at the University of Chicago, Northeastern Illinois University and at high schools serving at-risk students.

A former doctoral student in English literature, Ulaby worked as an intern for the features desk of the Topeka Capital-Journal after graduating from Bryn Mawr College. She was born in Amman, Jordan, and grew up in the idyllic Midwestern college towns of Lawrence, Kansas and Ann Arbor, Michigan.

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Story Archive

The YouTube Star Who's Teaching Kids How To Bake

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Isaac Hempstead Wright plays Bran Stark in the HBO adaptation of George R. R. Martin's Game of Thrones books. Some disability activists are concerned that Bran will be magically cured of his paralysis in the show's new season. Helen Sloan/HBO hide caption

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Helen Sloan/HBO

'Game Of Thrones' Finds Fans Among Disability Rights Activists, Too

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John Lennon (left) and Paul McCartney, pictured here circa 1960, met as teenagers in July 1957. Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Getty Images

60 Years Ago, 2 Boys Met And The Beatles Began

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Set Designer Uses Broadway Experience To Design Times Square Restaurant

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Canadian Comics Celebrate Their Country's Birth At LA Comedy Clubs

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

DAAAAAAAD! On Father's Day, An Homage To The Terrible Jokes They Tell

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Yoko Ono Joins John Lennon With Credit Line For Writing 'Imagine'

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Laura Ramadei (center) as Annie, who gets involved with a different couple in every episode of the web series Unicornland. Courtesy of Unicornland hide caption

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Courtesy of Unicornland

It's Polyamorous Polysaturation — Unconventional Relationships Abound On TV

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Eric "Bitty" Bittle takes to the ice in "Check Please," one of the most popular hockey webcomics (yes, that's a thing). Ngozi Ukazu hide caption

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Ngozi Ukazu

With 'Check Please,' A Comics Creator Rewrites The Rules — And Scores

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In 2007, the Writers Guild of America went on strike over revenues from Internet and DVD sales. Above, writers and supporters march in Los Angeles on Nov. 9, 2007, the fifth day of the strike. Reed Saxon/AP hide caption

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Writers Guild Of America Reaches A Tentative Deal With Studios

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"Literally I show up in the morning and I say, 'Who's dead?'" obit writer Bruce Weber explains in the film. "And somebody puts a folder on my desk and that's ... what I do that day." Weber took a buyout from The New York Times in 2016. Courtesy of Kino Lorber hide caption

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Courtesy of Kino Lorber

'Obit' Follows The 'Times' Team Charged With Turning Lives Into History

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