Neda Ulaby Neda Ulaby reports on arts, entertainment, and cultural trends for NPR's Arts Desk.
Doby Photography/NPR
Neda_Ulaby
Doby Photography/NPR

Neda Ulaby

Reporter, Arts Desk

Neda Ulaby reports on arts, entertainment, and cultural trends for NPR's Arts Desk.

Scouring the various and often overlapping worlds of art, music, television, film, new media and literature, Ulaby's radio and online stories reflect political and economic realities, cultural issues, obsessions and transitions, as well as artistic adventurousness— and awesomeness.

Over the last few years, Ulaby has strengthened NPR's television coverage both in terms of programming and industry coverage and profiled breakout artists such as Ellen Page and Skylar Grey and behind-the-scenes tastemakers ranging from super producer Timbaland to James Schamus, CEO of Focus Features. Her stories have included a series on women record producers, an investigation into exhibitions of plastinated human bodies, and a look at the legacy of gay activist Harvey Milk. Her profiles have brought listeners into the worlds of such performers as Tyler Perry, Ryan Seacrest, Mark Ruffalo, and Courtney Love.

Ulaby has earned multiple fellowships at the Getty Arts Journalism Program at USC Annenberg as well as a fellowship at the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism to study youth culture. In addition, Ulaby's weekly podcast of NPR's best arts stories. Culturetopia, won a Gracie award from the Alliance for Women in Media Foundation.

Joining NPR in 2000, Ulaby was recruited through NPR's Next Generation Radio, and landed a temporary position on the cultural desk as an editorial assistant. She started reporting regularly, augmenting her work with arts coverage for D.C.'s Washington City Paper.

Before coming to NPR, Ulaby worked as managing editor of Chicago's Windy City Times and co-hosted a local radio program, What's Coming Out at the Movies. Her film reviews and academic articles have been published across the country and internationally. For a time, she edited fiction for The Chicago Review and served on the editing staff of the leading academic journal Critical Inquiry. Ulaby taught classes in the humanities at the University of Chicago, Northeastern Illinois University and at high schools serving at-risk students.

A former doctoral student in English literature, Ulaby worked as an intern for the features desk of the Topeka Capital-Journal after graduating from Bryn Mawr College. She was born in Amman, Jordan, and grew up in the idyllic Midwestern college towns of Lawrence, Kansas and Ann Arbor, Michigan.

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Story Archive

When Hurricane Irma Closed Schools, Florida Museums Stepped In

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Evacuees at a special needs shelter sit and chat or rest, Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017, at Florida International University in Miami, Fla. About 30 people, including staff with the Florida Keys Outreach Coalition for the Homeless from Key West, Fla., were sheltered in a storefront underneath a parking garage on campus. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Miami Hurricane Shelter Still Packed - With People And Pets

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Phoenix police officers stand beside a dump truck blocking a road outside the Phoenix Convention Center on Aug. 22. Protests were held against President Trump as he planned to host a rally inside the convention center. Matt York/AP hide caption

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How Garbage Trucks Are Used To Stop Vehicle Attacks

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Scholars Say White Supremacists Chanting 'Deus Vult' Got History Wrong

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Dougie Baldwin (left) and Aaron Moten are two of the stars in the new Netflix comedy Disjointed, which is set in a medical marijuana dispensary. Patrick Wymore/Netflix hide caption

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'Disjointed' Is Like Any Workplace Sitcom — With More Pot, Sex And Language

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Some YouTube stars seek counseling and take breaks from online life to deal with symptoms of anxiety. Eva Bee/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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YouTube Stars Stress Out, Just Like The Rest Of Us

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In Netflix's new show The Defenders, Jessica Jones and her superhero friends patrol the grim and gritty streets of a Hell's Kitchen that no longer exists in today's New York. Sarah Shatz/Netflix hide caption

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Marvel Comics Meet Reality On The Not-So-Mean Streets Of Hell's Kitchen

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Celebrated Playwright And Actor Sam Shepard Dies

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The YouTube Star Who's Teaching Kids How To Bake

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Isaac Hempstead Wright plays Bran Stark in the HBO adaptation of George R. R. Martin's Game of Thrones books. Some disability activists are concerned that Bran will be magically cured of his paralysis in the show's new season. Helen Sloan/HBO hide caption

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'Game Of Thrones' Finds Fans Among Disability Rights Activists, Too

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