Scott Simon
Will O'Leary/N/A

Scott Simon

Host, Weekend Edition Saturday

Scott Simon is one of America's most admired writers and broadcasters. He has reported from all fifty states, five continents, and ten wars, from El Salvador to Sarajevo to Afghanistan and Iraq. His books have chronicled character and characters, in war and peace, sports and art, tragedy and comedy.

Simon's weekly show, Weekend Edition Saturday, has been called by the Washington Post, "the most literate, witty, moving, and just plain interesting news show on any dial," and by Brett Martin of Time-Out New York "the most eclectic, intelligent two hours of broadcasting on the airwaves." He has won every major award in broadcasting, including the Peabody, the Emmy, the Columbia-DuPont, the Ohio State Award, the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award, and the Sidney Hillman Award. Simon received the Presidential End Hunger Award for his coverage of the Ethiopian civil war and famine, and a special citation from the Peabody Awards for his weekly essays, which were cited as "consistently thoughtful, graceful, and challenging." He has also received the Barry M. Goldwater Award from the Human Rights Fund. Recently, he was awarded the Studs Terkel Award.

Simon has hosted many television specials, including the PBS's "State of Mind," "Voices of Vision," and "Need to Know." "The Paterson Project" won a national Emmy, as did his two-hour special from the Rio earth summit meeting. He co-anchored PBS's "Millennium 2000" coverage in concert with the BBC, and has co-hosted the televised Columbia-DuPont Awards. He also became familiar to viewers in Great Britain as host of the continuing BBC series, "Eyewitness," and a special on the White House press corps. He has appeared as a guest and commentator on all major networks, including BBC, NBC, CNN, and ESPN.

Simon has contributed articles to The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The New York Times Book Review, The Wall Street Journal, The Sunday Times of London, The Guardian, and Gourmet among other publications, and won a James Beard Award for his story, "Conflict Cuisine" in Gourmet. He has received numerous honorary degrees.

Sports Illustrated called his book Home and Away: Memoir of a Fan "extraordinary...uniformly superb...a memoir of such breadth and reach that it compares favorably with Fredrick Exley's A Fan's Notes." It was at the top of several non-fiction bestseller lists. His book, and Jackie Robinson and the Integration of Baseball, was Barnes and Nobles' Sports Book of the Year. His novel, Pretty Birds, the story of two teenage girls in Sarajevo during the siege, received rave reviews, Scott Turow calling it, "the most auspicious fiction debut by a journalist of note since Tom Wolfe's. . . always gripping, always tender, and often painfully funny. It is a marvel of technical finesse, close observation, and a perfectly pitched heart." Windy City, Simon's second novel, is a political comedy set in the Chicago City Council. Baby, We Were Meant for Each Other, an essay about the joys of adoption, was published in August 2010.

Simon's tweets to his 1.25 million Twitter followers from his mother's bedside in the summer of 2013 gathered major media attention around the world. He is completing a book on their last week together that will appear in time for Mother's Day 2015.

Simon is a native of Chicago and the son of comedian Ernie Simon and Patricia Lyons Simon. His hobbies are books, theater, ballet, British comedy, Mexican cooking and "bleeding for the Chicago Cubs." He appeared as Mother Ginger in the Ballet Austin production of The Nutcracker.

More from Scott Simon

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Story Archive

Newly elected Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez gives a victory speech during the general session of the DNC winter meeting in Atlanta, Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017. Branden Camp/AP hide caption

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Branden Camp/AP

What The Hell's Behind All This Cursing?

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A 9-year-old survivor of a chemical attack on a rebel-held region of Syria on Tuesday receives medical treatment at a hospital in Idlib, Syria, on Wednesday. Mohammed Karkas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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A Meditation On 'Evil'

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Zeshan Bagewadi's new album combines American funk and soul with Punjabi lyrics. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

The Second-Generation Soul Of Zeshan Bagewadi

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Their Finest stars Gemma Arterton as a brilliant young scriptwriter, and Billy Nighy as an aging actor who still wants to be cast as the romantic lead. Nicola Dove/STX Entertainment Motion Picture Artwork hide caption

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Nicola Dove/STX Entertainment Motion Picture Artwork

The British At 'Their Finest': How A Nation Kept Calm And Carried On

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Family, Death And A Road Trip In 'Ashes To Asheville'

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In 'Our Short History,' A Dying Single Mom Pens A Letter To Her Son

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French artist Abraham Poincheval sits over real chicken eggs until they hatch at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris. Stephane de Sakutin /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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An Artist Incubating Chicken Eggs Is No Joke. But Is It Art?

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Wright describes Martha, her Americans character, as an "average, everyday person that's open and trusting and loving." Patrick Harbron/FX hide caption

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Patrick Harbron/FX

We Are All Martha: Alison Wright On How Her 'Americans' Character Became A Hit

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These 'Women In The Castle' Provide New Perspectives On Nazi Germany

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People lay floral tributes to the victims of the March 22 terror attack in Parliament Square outside the Houses of Parliament in central London. Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Keeping Calm In London, In Spite Of Terror

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The league-wide's secret recipe to success is out: The NBA and the PB&J go together like, well ... Sharon White/Getty Images hide caption

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The Pregame PB&J: How The Comfort Food Became The NBA's Recipe For Success

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Mohammed Mohiedin Anis, or Abu Omar, 70, smokes his pipe as he sits in his destroyed bedroom listening to music on his vinyl player, gramophone, in Aleppo's formerly rebel-held al-Shaar neighbourhood. Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Living Among the Ruins In Aleppo, A Man Keeps Playing His Songs

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More Than 100 Diners Skip Out On A Restaurant Bill — In A Conga Line

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The skull of La Ferrassie Neanderthal, from France. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Some Plaque To Build A Theory On: Did Humans And Neanderthals Kiss?

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