Wanda Kos is undecided this election year, but voted for Barack Obama in 2008. She is concerned for the future of her daughter Sofia, 6, and her two older children, including one son who just joined the military Becky Lettenberger/NPR hide caption

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Sofia Martinez, 40, is a registered nurse in Plant City, Fla., who supports both the DREAM Act and Republican Mitt Romney, who says he would veto it. Becky Lettenberger/NPR hide caption

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Parkesdale Farm Market is run by Jim Meeks, 70, and his extended family, including his daughter-in-law Xiamara Meeks, 36. Business is booming and the stand has been a mainstay on presidential campaign stops since the days of George H.W. Bush. Becky Lettenberger/NPR hide caption

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Gregory Brown, 52, lives in a trailer park community in Lutz, Fla., near the corner of First and Main streets. He lives off unemployment checks and blames President Obama for his financial difficulties. Becky Lettenberger/NPR hide caption

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Katrina Bordwell's home was flooded recently after nearby development stopped up a drainage pipe. Bordwell, 24, lives in the community with her children, from left, Leo, 3, her boyfriend's son Kyle Cose, 3, and Zoey, 5. Becky Lettenberger/NPR hide caption

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Three students outside the Science College of Benghazi University. They say they expect to have opportunities in Libya that would not have been possible when Moammar Gadhafi was in power. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Mohammed Tolba (center) talks with friends at a coffee shop in the Cairo suburbs. The 33-year-old Egyptian is trying to change the public perception of Salafists, Muslims who believe in a literal interpretation of the Quran. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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One of the founders of Egypt's satirical online magazine El Koshary Today, Taha Belal, 28, at the Freedom Bar in downtown Cairo. Since Egypt's revolution last year, political parody has become popular on the Internet. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Scenes from the Khan el-Khalili market in downtown Cairo. Election posters for the two candidates in Egypt's upcoming runoff election can be seen hanging above the street. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Libyans rally in favor of Shariah law, in Benghazi, eastern Libya. The city was the birthplace of the uprising that ousted Moammar Gadhafi. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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A destroyed apartment building in Tawargha, south of the Libyan coastal city of Misrata. Rebels from Misrata destroyed Tawargha, accusing residents of supporting Moammar Gadhafi and committing atrocities. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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A map of the oil pipelines at Al-Sidrah. The man pointing to the map is Abujala Zenati, who had retired as manager of the operation. He says he returned to work after the revolution to help support the new Libya. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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A scene from the Kairouan medina - where some of the street scenes from Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark were filmed. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Children ride the train, hopping in and out of the open doors, from Tunis to the suburb of Sidi Bou Said. John Poole/NPR hide caption

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Tunisian women walk through the narrow streets of Tunis' medina, or marketplace. Compared to women in other Arab countries, Tunisian women have had access to education and job opportunities for decades. John Poole/NPR hide caption

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