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Danielle Kurtzleben - 2015
Caitlin Sanders/NPR

Danielle Kurtzleben

Political Reporter

Danielle Kurtzleben is a political reporter assigned to NPR's Washington Desk. In her current role, she writes for npr.org's It's All Politics blog, focusing on data visualizations. In the run-up to the 2016 election, she will be using numbers to tell stories that go far beyond polling, putting policies into context and illustrating how they affect voters.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Kurtzleben spent a year as a correspondent for Vox.com. As part of the site's original reporting team, she covered economics and business news.

Prior to Vox.com, Kurtzleben was with U.S. News & World Report for nearly four years, where she covered the economy, campaign finance and demographic issues. As associate editor, she launched Data Mine, a data visualization blog on usnews.com.

A native of Titonka, Iowa, Kurtzleben has a bachelor's degree in English from Carleton College. She also holds a master's degree in Global Communication from George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs.

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Story Archive

Analyzing Trump's Patterns Of Tweeting

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Alyson Hurt and Danielle Kurtzleben/NPR

We Asked People What They Know About Taxes. See If You Know The Answers

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President Trump hosts Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla., on April 7. Despite repeatedly making the claim during the campaign, Trump said this week China is not a currency manipulator. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

This picture taken on Dec. 14, 2016, at a news stand in Shanghai shows an advertisement for a magazine featuring Donald Trump, who would soon take office as president, on the cover. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

Vice President Joe Biden, President Obama and Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood deliver remarks highlighting the transportation projects and infrastructure jobs created by Obama's economic stimulus plan in 2009. Michael Reynolds/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Reynolds/Pool/Getty Images

Graham set out strict rules to keep his ministry from having any whiff of impropriety. That broad philosophy could be useful to White Houses. Stephen Chernin/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Chernin/Getty Images

Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price at a March 17 news conference with Reps. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., and Pat Tiberi, R-Ohio. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump released his budget blueprint on Thursday, calling for a boost in military spending and deep cuts in the Environmental Protection Agency and other programs. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Trump Unveils 'Hard Power' Budget That Boosts Military Spending

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