Fort Hood Shooter To Represent Himself In Court-Martial
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Tourists visit Angkor Wat in Siem Reap province, Cambodia, in April. Will Baxter for NPR hide caption

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At Cambodia Hotel, The Workers Are The Boss
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The PBF Energy refinery in Paulsboro, N.J., uses toxic chemicals such as hydrofluoric acid. Rather than using "inherently safer" design methods, the industry says, other safety measures are taken to prevent accidents like the one in West, Texas. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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After Deadly Chemical Plant Disasters, There's Little Action
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Agencies That Oversee Fertilizer Plants Have Spotty Records
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Researchers Question Obama's Motives For BRAIN Initiative
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Deuk Chamnan (right), a credit officer at First Finance, speaks with a potential client while passing out leaflets at Century Market in Phnom Penh. First Finance also advertises on the radio. Will Baxter for NPR hide caption

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New Mortgage Program Helps Cambodia's Poor Find Better Homes
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A sockeye salmon that was caught from the research vessel Miss Delta off the coast of Vancouver is examined. The MSC has certified the fish as "sustainable" even though there is concern from scientists and environmentalists. Brett Beadle for NPR hide caption

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Conditions Allow For More Sustainable-Labeled Seafood
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Dennis Roseman, left, and Jamie Manganello pull in a swordfish off the coast of Florida. The Day Boat Seafood company went through a complicated process to become certified as a sustainable fishery by the Marine Stewardship Council. Chip Litherland for NPR hide caption

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For A Florida Fishery, 'Sustainable' Success After Complex Process
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Capt. Art Gaeten holds a blue shark that was caught during a research trip in Nova Scotia. Scientists are studying the impact of swordfish fishing methods on the shark population. Dean Casavechia for NPR hide caption

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Is Sustainable-Labeled Seafood Really Sustainable?
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Retired Army Major Michelle Dyarman holds the Purple Heart medal she was awarded after suffering a severe concussion from an IED in Baghdad in 2005. Robb Hill for NPR hide caption

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Once Denied A Purple Heart, A Soldier Gets Her Medal
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A training session for instructors who teach hand-to-hand combat, or combatives, at the Fort Benning military base in Georgia. Pouya Dianat for NPR hide caption

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Before Reaching War Zones, Troops Risk Concussions
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Jay Blake (left), who served in the Marines, rides the elevator with his fellow students at Sierra Community College in Rocklin, Calif. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Program Teaches Vets How To Survive The Classroom
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In 2010 US Army veteran Jeff Barillaro returned from Iraq with severe PTSD. Since then Barillaro, whose stage name is "Solider Hard," has been rapping about his struggles and performing for troops, veterans, and military families across the US. Erik M. Lunsford/NPR hide caption

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For One Soldier, Rap Is A Powerful Postwar Weapon
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