The sun illuminates a row of homes at Park Plaza Cooperative in Fridley, Minn. Five years ago, the residents formed a nonprofit co-op and bought their entire neighborhood from the company that owned it. Bridget Bennett for NPR hide caption

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Bridget Bennett for NPR

When Residents Take Ownership, A Mobile Home Community Thrives

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Dawn Tachell looks at the trash and debris that have collected in her community. Conditions in the neighborhood have become so bad that some people have abandoned their houses and moved out. Jed Conklin for NPR hide caption

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Jed Conklin for NPR

Mobile Home Park Owners Can Spoil An Affordable American Dream

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The Pentagon building complex is seen from Air Force One on June 29. An Army review concludes that commanders did nothing wrong when they kicked out more than 22,000 soldiers for misconduct after they came back from Iraq or Afghanistan – even though all of those troops had been diagnosed with mental health problems or brain injuries. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Senators, Military Specialists Say Army Report On Dismissed Soldiers Is Troubling

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NPR's Past April Fools' Day Pranks

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Larry Morrison, who returned home with post-traumatic stress disorder after four tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, is being kicked out of the Army for misconduct, leaving him without military benefits. Michael de Yoanna/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Michael de Yoanna/Colorado Public Radio

Senators Want Moratorium On Dismissing Soldiers During Investigation

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An MRI scan shows Bryan Arling's brain from above. The white-looking fluid is a subdural hematoma, or a collection of blood, that pushed part of his brain away from the skull, causing headaches and slowing his decision-making. Courtesy of Dr. Ingrid Ott, Washington Radiology Associates hide caption

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Courtesy of Dr. Ingrid Ott, Washington Radiology Associates

Evans Army Community Hospital, which stands on the Fort Carson military base, is a central part of the base's behavioral health system. Courtesy of Evans Army Community Hospital/U.S. Army hide caption

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Courtesy of Evans Army Community Hospital/U.S. Army

Larry Morrison is appealing the Army's decision to dismiss him for misconduct. Michael de Yoanna/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Michael de Yoanna/Colorado Public Radio

Missed Treatment: Soldiers With Mental Health Issues Dismissed For 'Misconduct'

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Vietnam War Study Raises Concerns About Veterans' Mental Health

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OSHA Launches Program To Protect Nursing Employees

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Michael Bolla and Sally Singer lift Leon Anders using a ceiling lift and sling at the VA Hospital in Loma Linda, Calif. The VA system is among a very small number of hospitals that have installed equipment and provided proper training so their nursing staff can avoid physically lifting and moving patients themselves. Annie Tritt for NPR hide caption

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Annie Tritt for NPR

Despite High Rates Of Nursing Injuries, Government Regulators Take Little Action

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To safely lift Bernard Valencia out of his hospital bed, Cheri Moore uses a ceiling lift and sling. The VA hospital in Loma Linda, Calif., has safe patient handling technology installed throughout its entire facility. Annie Tritt for NPR hide caption

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Annie Tritt for NPR

At VA Hospitals, Training And Technology Reduce Nurses' Injuries

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Terry Cawthorn was a nurse at Mission Hospital for more than 20 years. But after a series of back injuries, mainly from lifting patients, she was fired. Cawthorn took legal action against the hospital and still faces daily struggles as a result of her injury. Susannah Kay for NPR hide caption

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Susannah Kay for NPR

Hospital To Nurses: Your Injuries Are Not Our Problem

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