Adrian Florido

Reporter, Code Switch

Adrian Florido is a reporter for NPR's Code Switch team, where he covers race, identity, and culture.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Florido was a reporter at Member station KPCC in Los Angeles, where he covered public and community health. Prior to that, he was at KPBS in San Diego, reporting on the U.S.-Mexico border, immigration, and demographics as a member of the Fronteras Desk, a team of reporters covering the changing Southwest. He began his journalism career reporting on people and neighborhoods at the Voice of San Diego.

Florido is a Southern California native. He graduated from the University of Chicago with a degree in history, with an emphasis on the U.S. and Latin America. He was news editor of the student paper, the Chicago Maroon. He's a runner and loves good coffee and great music. He has a particular love of traditional string music from the Mexican state of Veracruz, a style often called Son Jarocho. He travels to Veracruz as often as possible to learn from master musicians. He's also one of the organizers of the Fandango Fronterizo, an annual event during which musicians gather on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border and play together through the fence that separates San Diego from Tijuana.

You can listen to Florido's stories here, and follow him on Twitter at @adrianflorido.

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Story Archive

Catalina Rodriguez-Lima runs a city office whose mission is to attract new immigrants to Baltimore, a strategy for reversing decades of population decline. Adrian Florido hide caption

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Adrian Florido

Cities Create Defense Funds For Immigrants Facing Deportation

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California Debates Bill To Stop Cooperation With Federal Immigration Enforcement

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Churches Still Figuring Out How To Protect Immigrants And Themselves

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Hit-and-run accidents in California decreased by as much as 10 percent after the state passed a law in 2013 granting driver's licenses to unauthorized immigrants, say researchers at Stanford University. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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Sanctuary Churches: Who Controls The Story?

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In the revival of Luis Valdez's "Zoot Suit," young pachucos go on trial for a murder they did not commit. In this scene, the judge requires the men to go on trial in the clothes they were wearing when they were arrested. Craig Schwartz hide caption

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Craig Schwartz

Astrid Silva delivered a Democratic response in Spanish to President Trump's first speech to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

In Spanish-Language Response, Activist Says Trump Is Inspiring Discrimination

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How 'Little Tokyo' Of Los Angeles Changed Into 'Bronzeville' And Back Again

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Arizona Woman's Deportation Illustrates New Standard Under Trump

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A study by the think tank Demos finds that black and Latino families with two parents still own only half as much as wealth as white single parents. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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