Scott Detrow 2016 i
Meg Kelly/NPR
Scott Detrow 2016
Meg Kelly/NPR

Scott Detrow

Political Reporter

Scott Detrow covers the 2016 election's technology and data angles for NPR. That includes everything from how campaigns are using social media to spread their message, to what sort of information they're using to find and target specific voters.

Before joining NPR, Detrow worked as a statehouse reporter for member stations WITF in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and KQED in San Francisco. He has also covered energy policy for NPR's StateImpact project, where his reports on Pennsylvania's hydraulic fracturing boom won a DuPont-Columbia and national Edward R. Murrow Award in 2013.

Scott got his start in public radio at Fordham University's WFUV. He graduated from Fordham, despite spending most of his time in the newsroom, and is also working toward completing a master's degree at the University of Pennsylvania's Fels Institute of Government.

[+] read more[-] less

The Triborough Bridge is seen under construction in New York City on July 10, 1935. The bridge, now known as the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge, connects Long Island with Manhattan. The Dutch Prime Minister is a fan of the biographer of Robert Moses, who was involved in building the bridge. Associated Press hide caption

toggle caption Associated Press

Sen. Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont, speaks during a campaign event in Los Angeles, Calif., on March 23. Patrick T. Fallon/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Patrick T. Fallon/Getty Images
Making Democrats' Primaries More Open Could Be Harder Than You Think
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/478875217/478906502" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Donald Trump greets supporters after a campaign in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., last month. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

toggle caption Mel Evans/AP
Can Trump Turn Pennsylvania's Disaffected Democrats Into Believers By November?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/478417173/478417174" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Time is running out for a conservative to launch a national third-party presidential campaign, as Ross Perot did in 1992. Doug Mills/AP hide caption

toggle caption Doug Mills/AP
Is It Too Late For A Third-Party Presidential Candidate To Run?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/477449879/477449880" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

P. J. O'Rourke, speaking in 2004. The conservative author says he's reluctantly backing Hillary Clinton this year, now that Donald Trump is the expected Republican nominee. Brian Kersey /AP hide caption

toggle caption Brian Kersey /AP
Listen to Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/477339063/477341671" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Former Indiana basketball coach Bob Knight campaigns with Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump in Evansville, Ind. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

toggle caption Darron Cummings/AP
Why Bobby Knight And A Rogues' Gallery Of Athletes Are Flocking To Trump
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476419514/476419515" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Republicans Hunt For Delegates In An Unlikely Place: Democratic Districts
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474395547/474411610" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sen. Ted Cruz speaks at the Colorado Republican State Convention, in Colorado Springs, Colo., on Saturday, where he added 13 more delegate wins to his earlier sweep of 21 state delegates. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

toggle caption Brennan Linsley/AP