Anthony Kuhn International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn is currently based in Beijing, China.

Hong Kong Bookseller Describes Harrowing Ordeal With Chinese Police

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University students who belong to indigenous tribes prepare for a ceremony to affirm their ethnic identity. Taiwan's aboriginal tribes arrived thousands of years before Chinese immigrants, but now account for only 2 percent of the population. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

Taiwan's Aborigines Hope A New President Will Bring Better Treatment

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Chinese Billionaire Takes On Disney With His Own Theme Parks

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Taiwan Inaugurates First Female President

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Chinese lesbian couple Rui Cai (left) and Cleo Wu play with their twin babies, born last month. China does not allow same-sex marriages, and only married, heterosexual couples have access to assisted reproduction. The women went through in vitro fertilization in the U.S., and the children were born in China. Courtesy of Rui Cai and Cleo Wu hide caption

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Courtesy of Rui Cai and Cleo Wu

Undaunted By China's Rule Book, Lesbian Couple Welcomes Their Newborn Twins

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Baidu, China's largest search engine, is under investigation after a college student with a rare form of cancer said it promoted a fraudulent treatment. Alexander F. Yuan/AP hide caption

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Alexander F. Yuan/AP

China Investigates Search Engine Baidu After Student Dies Of Cancer

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China Opens Investigation Into Search Engine Baidu After Student's Death

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Chinese officials answer questions about a new law regulating overseas nongovernmental organizations during a press conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Thursday. The new law subjects NGOs to close police supervision. "We welcome and support all foreign NGOs to come to China to conduct friendly exchanges," one official said. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

China Passes Law Putting Foreign NGOs Under Stricter Police Control

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At a Chinese hospital, a woman holds her child, who's receiving a rabies vaccine after being scratched by a cat. Vaccines against rabies were among the millions that were part of a newly discovered racket, reselling vaccines that hadn't been refrigerated. VCG/Getty Images hide caption

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VCG/Getty Images

Why Chinese Parents Don't Necessarily Trust Childhood Vaccines

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Aung San Suu Kyi (left) speaks with military generals during the presidential handover ceremony in Naypyitaw, Myanmar on Wednesday. Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, will hold several top positions in the new civilian government, including the post of foreign minister. Nyein Chan Naing/AP hide caption

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Nyein Chan Naing/AP

Chinese President Xi Jinping, photographed at The Great Hall Of The People in Beijing, is expected to get a second and final term at a Communist Party congress next year. Lintao Zhang/Getty Images hide caption

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Lintao Zhang/Getty Images

China Hunts For Author Of Anonymous Letter Critical Of Xi Jinping

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China's U.N. Ambassador Liu Jieyi speaks with U.S. Ambassador Samantha Power before the Security Council vote on sanctions against North Korea on March 2. Don Emmert /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert /AFP/Getty Images

Why China Supports New Sanctions Against North Korea

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Former Houston Rockets basketball player Yao Ming arrived at China's Great Hall of the People to attend the opening session of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference in Beijing on March 3. Many prominent Chinese figures take part, though delegates lack real power. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

China's Legislative Session: Many Stars, But Little Power

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Aung San Suu Kyi Will Not Be Myanmar's Next President

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