The Chinese government-selected Panchen Lama, Gyaincain Norbu (right), took part in the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference in Beijing on March 14. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

International Tribunal Rules Against China's Claims In The South China Sea

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485740537/485740538" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

International Tribunal Rejects China's Claim To South China Sea

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485661729/485661730" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Small fishing boats sit in the dock in Tanmen on Hainan Island. The government has subsidized the upgrading of Tanmen's fishing fleet as part of its drive to exert more control in the South China Sea. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Anthony Kuhn/NPR

In A Chinese Port Town, South China Sea Dispute Is Personal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485512618/485512619" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Historic Shifts In Public Opinion Made Election Firsts Possible In Taiwan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484756563/484756564" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hong Kong Bookseller Describes Harrowing Ordeal With Chinese Police

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/482432806/482432827" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

University students who belong to indigenous tribes prepare for a ceremony to affirm their ethnic identity. Taiwan's aboriginal tribes arrived thousands of years before Chinese immigrants, but now account for only 2 percent of the population. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Anthony Kuhn/NPR

Taiwan's Aborigines Hope A New President Will Bring Better Treatment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480482854/481667051" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chinese Billionaire Takes On Disney With His Own Theme Parks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/479420387/479420388" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Taiwan Inaugurates First Female President

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/478804630/478804631" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chinese lesbian couple Rui Cai (left) and Cleo Wu play with their twin babies, born last month. China does not allow same-sex marriages, and only married, heterosexual couples have access to assisted reproduction. The women went through in vitro fertilization in the U.S., and the children were born in China. Courtesy of Rui Cai and Cleo Wu hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Rui Cai and Cleo Wu

Undaunted By China's Rule Book, Lesbian Couple Welcomes Their Newborn Twins

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/477660115/477758601" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Baidu, China's largest search engine, is under investigation after a college student with a rare form of cancer said it promoted a fraudulent treatment. Alexander F. Yuan/AP hide caption

toggle caption Alexander F. Yuan/AP

China Investigates Search Engine Baidu After Student Dies Of Cancer

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476673789/476735437" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

China Opens Investigation Into Search Engine Baidu After Student's Death

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476639222/476639223" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chinese officials answer questions about a new law regulating overseas nongovernmental organizations during a press conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Thursday. The new law subjects NGOs to close police supervision. "We welcome and support all foreign NGOs to come to China to conduct friendly exchanges," one official said. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

toggle caption Ng Han Guan/AP

China Passes Law Putting Foreign NGOs Under Stricter Police Control

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476060206/476060561" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

At a Chinese hospital, a woman holds her child, who's receiving a rabies vaccine after being scratched by a cat. Vaccines against rabies were among the millions that were part of a newly discovered racket, reselling vaccines that hadn't been refrigerated. VCG/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption VCG/Getty Images

Why Chinese Parents Don't Necessarily Trust Childhood Vaccines

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475629964/475631375" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript