A local resident entertains visitors to the Kawah Kamojang geothermal field in West Java. He puts a length of bamboo to the steam coming from the ground to make a whistle, then throws soda cans into the vent, which shoots them high into the air. The Dutch colonial government drilled Indonesia's first geothermal wells at Kamojang in 1926, when the country was still known as the Dutch East Indies. Yosef Riadi for NPR hide caption

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For Future Energy, Volcanic Indonesia Bets On Heat

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Muslims (in the foreground) face a group of Christians during a bloody clash in Ambon, the provincial capital of Indonesia's Maluku Island, on Sept. 11, 2011. The riot exposed deep fault lines between Christians and Muslims in Indonesia. Angkotasan/Getty Images hide caption

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Hard-Line Muslims Test Indonesia's Tolerance

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U.S. Marines are shown during a training exercise south of Darwin, Australia. Marines recently arrived in Australia as part of a move by the U.S. to place greater emphasis on Asia and the Pacific. Glenn Campbell/The Sydney Morning Herald/Fairfax Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Are U.S. Troops In Australia A Hedge Against China?

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Gambling machines are extremely popular in Australia, and there are concerns about the level of gambling addiction. Opinion polls show that many Australians would like to see greater regulation of gambling. Paul Miller/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Australia's Poker Machines: Are They Too Popular?

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A man gathering firewood to sell cuts down mangrove trees in the coastal area of Medan city on Indonesia's Sumatra island on Jan. 31. The country, which has one-quarter of the world's mangroves, is losing them at a rate of 6 percent a year. The coastal forests play important ecological and environmental roles. Suntanta Aditya/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Drama Amid Indonesia's Disappearing Mangroves

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A coup attempt in Indonesia on Sept. 30, 1965, triggered a series of events that led to the ouster of President Sukarno and unleashed a wave of violence against suspected communists in the country that left up to 1 million people dead. In this photo from 1965, Indonesian soldiers watch suspected communists held at Tangerang, a suburb of Jakarta, the Indonesian capital. Bettmann/Corbis /AP hide caption

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Exposing Indonesia's Cold War Communist Purge

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Aung San Suu Kyi Wins Myanmar Parliament Seat

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Supporters of the opposition National League for Democracy celebrate their victory in parliamentary elections outside the party headquarters in Yangon, Myanmar, on Sunday. The results could help to consolidate support for political reforms and herald the end of foreign sanctions on the country. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Myanmar Party Says Dissident Leader Wins Election

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A man holds a portrait of Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi during a rally for a candidate of her National League for Democracy party on Friday. The country is holding elections for some parliamentary seats on Sunday. Christophe Archambault/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Myanmar Hurriedly Prepares For An Election

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Myanmar opposition figure Aung San Suu Kyi speaks to supporters on Saturday. Voting in parliamentary elections this Sunday is considered a test of the political reforms that Myanmar's rulers have introduced over the past year. Khin Maung Win/AP hide caption

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Myanmar's Election Seen As A Test Of Reforms

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Fukumoto in one of the numerous period costume dramas he has acted in for the Toei Company's film studios since he began work there in 1959. Toei Kyoto Studio Park hide caption

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In Japan, 'Sliced-Up Actors' Are A Dying Breed

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Demolished ships lie strewn about near the fishing port of Minamisanriku town, in Miyagi prefecture, northeastern Japan, Feb. 23, 2012. The local fisherman's union says last year's tsunami wiped out 90 percent of local fishing boats. Yuriko Makao/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Rethinking, Not Just Rebuilding, Japan's Northeast

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Japanese Village Marks Disasters' Anniversary

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Members of the media, wearing protective suits and masks, visit the tsunami-crippled Fukushima nuclear power station during a press tour, in northeastern Japan's Fukushima prefecture, Feb. 28. Japan is marking the first anniversary of the March 11 tsunami and earthquake, which triggered the worst nuclear accident in the country's history. Kimimasa Mayama/AP hide caption

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A Year On, Japan Is Still Looking For The Road Ahead

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