Anthony Kuhn
Wang Zemin/N/A

Anthony Kuhn

International Correspondent, Beijing, China

Anthony Kuhn is NPR's correspondent based in Bejing, China, covering the great diversity of Asia's countries and cultures. Throughout his coverage he has taken an interest in China's rich traditional culture and its impact on the current day. He has recorded the sonic calling cards of itinerant merchants in Beijing's back alleys, and the descendants of court musicians of the Tang Dynasty. He has profiled petitioners and rights lawyers struggling for justice, and educational reformers striving to change the way Chinese think.

From 2010-2013, Kuhn was NPR's Southeast Asia correspondent, based in Jakarta, Indonesia. Among other stories, he explored Borneo and Sumatra, and witnessed the fight to preserve the biodiversity of the world's oldest forests. He also followed Myanmar's democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi, as she rose from political prisoner to head of state.

During a previous tour in China from 2006-2010, Kuhn covered the Beijing Olympics, and the devastating Sichuan earthquake that preceded it. He looked at life in the heart of Lhasa, Tibet's capital, and the recovery of Japan's northeast coast after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

Kuhn served as NPR's correspondent in London from 2004-2005, covering stories including the London subway bombings, and the marriage of the Prince of Wales to the Duchess of Cornwall.

Besides his major postings, Kuhn's journalistic horizons have been expanded by various short-term assignments. These produced stories including wartime black humor in Iraq, musical diplomacy by the New York Philharmonic in Pyongyang, North Korea, a kerfuffle over the plumbing in Jerusalem's Church of the Holy Sepulcher, Pakistani artists' struggle with religious extremism in Lahore, and the Syrian civil war's spillover into neighboring Lebanon.

Previous to joining NPR, Kuhn wrote for the Far Eastern Economic Review and freelanced for various news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times and Newsweek. He majored in French Literature as an undergraduate at Washington University in St. Louis, and later did graduate work at the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American Studies in Nanjing.

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Story Archive

State Control Leaves Investigative Journalists In China Demoralized

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In a photo provided Saturday by the Shenyang Municipal Information Office, Liu Xia, center, the widow of Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo, holds a portrait of him during his funeral. She stands with Liu Hui, her younger brother (left) and Liu Xiaoxuan, the younger brother of her late husband, who is holding his cremated remains. AP hide caption

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AP

Chinese Dissident And Nobel Laureate Liu Xiaobo Dies At 61

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A chair sat empty for Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo in Oslo, Norway, in 2010. The rights activist was imprisoned in China in 2009. Heiko Junge/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Heiko Junge/AFP/Getty Images

Protesters display portraits of jailed Chinese Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo outside the Chinese liaison office in Hong Kong on Wednesday. Liu has expressed the wish to leave China for medical treatment, but the government has refused. Vincent Yu/AP hide caption

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Vincent Yu/AP

As China's Strength Has Grown, So Has Its Unwillingness To Let Dissidents Leave

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China Less Willing To Send Dissidents Abroad Than Before

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Qinhuangdao's elevated bus, seen last month in this photo, will not move forward. The municipal government denied it had endorsed the project, and last month began dismantling the test site. VCG/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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VCG/VCG via Getty Images

China's Elevated Bus Project Seemed Too Good To Be True — And It Was

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Traffic Solution Project In China Appears To Be An Investment Scam

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A new urban district and an annual big-data expo have arisen in recent years as the centerpiece of the high-tech industry in Guiyang, capital of Guizhou province. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

A Remote Chinese Province Uses Its Climate To Grow A Big-Data Industry

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A driver uses his smartphone to pay the highway toll with Alipay, an app of Alibaba's online payment service, in the Chinese city of Hangzhou. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

In China, A Cashless Trend Is Taking Hold With Mobile Payments

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News Brief: Cost Of GOP's Health Bill, Travel Ban Gets A Reprieve

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U.S. To Declare China A Significant Human Trafficking Offender

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A Huajian shoe factory, which has been investigated by labor activists, makes Ivanka Trump-branded shoes, among others, in China. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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China Detains Activist Investigating Factory Making Ivanka Trump Shoes

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