Anthony Kuhn
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Anthony Kuhn

International Correspondent, Jakarta, Indonesia

International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn official base is Jakarta, Indonesia, where he opened NPR's first bureau in that country in 2010. From there, he has covered Southeast Asia, and the gamut of natural and human diversity stretching from Myanmar to Fiji and Vietnam to Tasmania. During 2013-2014, he is covering Beijing, China, as NPR's Louisa Lim is on fellowship.

Prior to Jakarta, Kuhn spent five years based in Beijing as a NPR foreign correspondent reporting on China and Northeast Asia. In that time Kuhn covered stories including the effect of China's resurgence on rest of the world, diplomacy and the environment, the ancient cultural traditions that still exert a profound influence in today's China, and the people's quest for social justice in a period of rapid modernization and uneven development. His beat also included such diverse topics as popular theater in Japan and the New York Philharmonic's 2008 musical diplomacy tour to Pyongyang, North Korea.

In 2004-2005, Kuhn was based in London for NPR. He covered stories ranging from the 2005 terrorist attacks on London's transport system to the wedding of Prince Charles and Camilla Parker Bowles. In the spring of 2005, he reported from Iraq on the formation of the post-election interim government.

Kuhn began contributing reports to NPR from China in 1996. During that time, he also worked as an accredited freelance reporter with the Los Angeles Times, and as Beijing correspondent for the Far Eastern Economic Review.

In what felt to him a previous incarnation, Kuhn once lived on Manhattan's Lower East Side and walked down Broadway to work in Chinatown as a social worker. He majored in French literature at Washington University in St. Louis. He gravitated to China in the early 1980s, studying first at the Beijing Foreign Languages Institute and later at the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American Studies in Nanjing.

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(Top) Geze Duoji's sister Danzeng Nongzuo enters her home. (Left) Zhaba Songding's mother Cili Zhuoma carries a load of hay home. (Right) Nazhu Zhuoma visits her husband's home. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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The Place In China Where The Women Lead

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The world's largest radio telescope is nestled among the jagged, green mountains of southwest China's Guizhou Province. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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In Southwest China, A 'Very Large Eyeball' Peers Into Deep Space

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U.S. Ambassador to China Max Baucus, a former Montana senator, recently became the first American envoy to China to visit all of the country's provinces. "We Americans have an obligation to come to China, to learn more about China," he tells NPR. "Why? Because with each passing day, it's going to be more and more in our future." Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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U.S. Envoy: China Will Be 'More And More In Our Future'

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A man takes a selfie near a picture of Chinese President Xi Jinping at an exhibition at a military museum in Beijing on Monday. Xi is expected to use an important meeting this week to re-emphasize his anti-graft campaign. Analysts say the campaign is also used to go after rival factions within the Communist Party. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

Behind China's Anti-Graft Campaign, A Drive To Crush Rivals

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Aspiring Internet star Huang Xian'er (right) live-streams a chat with a guest about hiking around Beijing. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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China's Internet Stars Embrace Lowbrow — And Aim For High Profits

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China Imposes Restrictions To Try To Cool Real Estate Bubble

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Trinh Thi Ngo, known to GIs as "Hanoi Hannah" during the Vietnam War, in 2015. Voice of Vietnam hide caption

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Voice of Vietnam

'Hanoi Hannah,' Whose Broadcasts Taunted And Entertained American GIs, Dies

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Beijing-based restaurateur Song Ji (right) demonstrates his system, which allows customers to tip waitstaff. Diners use smartphones to scan QR codes that the waitstaff wear on their sleeves. This generates a tip of 4.56 yuan, or about 70 cents. Waitress Liu Enhui (left), the top tip-getter at the restaurant, says she can earn up to $30 a day in tips. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Long Absent In China, Tipping Makes A Comeback At A Few Trendy Restaurants

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Ethnic Yi schoolgirls take a break halfway down the mountain, on their way from their homes in Atule'er village to their first day of school in a new semester. The difficulty of getting up and down the mountain has made it hard for villagers to shake off poverty, and made it challenging for their children to attend school. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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A Harrowing, Mountain-Scaling Commute For Chinese Schoolkids

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Jeffrey Wood has been studying at the Hopkins-Nanjing Center for Chinese and American Studies. He is now preparing for a career as a diplomat. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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For U.S. Minority Students In China, The Welcome Comes With Scrutiny

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Police Crush Uprising In Chinese Fishing Village Of Wukan

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A Chinese flag flies on a boat next to the bridge that spans the Yalu River linking the North Korean town of Sinuiju with the Chinese town of Dandong. Most of North Korea's trade is with China, and much of it crosses the border here. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Yuan Shanshan holds her 5-month-old baby on the outskirts of Beijing. Her husband, human rights lawyer Xie Yanyi, was arrested last year on charges of inciting subversion, and she's waiting until he's released to name the child. Xie is expected to stand trial soon. He's among a large number of Chinese human rights lawyers who have been prosecuted in the past year. Anthony Kuhn / NPR hide caption

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New Challenge For China's Human Rights Lawyers: Defending Themselves

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G-20 Summit Highlights Step Forward For U.S., China Relations

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