Anthony Kuhn International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn is currently based in Beijing, China.
Anthony Kuhn
Wang Zemin/N/A

Anthony Kuhn

International Correspondent, Beijing, China

Anthony Kuhn is NPR's correspondent based in Bejing, China, covering the great diversity of Asia's countries and cultures. Throughout his coverage he has taken an interest in China's rich traditional culture and its impact on the current day. He has recorded the sonic calling cards of itinerant merchants in Beijing's back alleys, and the descendants of court musicians of the Tang Dynasty. He has profiled petitioners and rights lawyers struggling for justice, and educational reformers striving to change the way Chinese think.

From 2010-2013, Kuhn was NPR's Southeast Asia correspondent, based in Jakarta, Indonesia. Among other stories, he explored Borneo and Sumatra, and witnessed the fight to preserve the biodiversity of the world's oldest forests. He also followed Myanmar's democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi, as she rose from political prisoner to head of state.

During a previous tour in China from 2006-2010, Kuhn covered the Beijing Olympics, and the devastating Sichuan earthquake that preceded it. He looked at life in the heart of Lhasa, Tibet's capital, and the recovery of Japan's northeast coast after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

Kuhn served as NPR's correspondent in London from 2004-2005, covering stories including the London subway bombings, and the marriage of the Prince of Wales to the Duchess of Cornwall.

Besides his major postings, Kuhn's journalistic horizons have been expanded by various short-term assignments. These produced stories including wartime black humor in Iraq, musical diplomacy by the New York Philharmonic in Pyongyang, North Korea, a kerfuffle over the plumbing in Jerusalem's Church of the Holy Sepulcher, Pakistani artists' struggle with religious extremism in Lahore, and the Syrian civil war's spillover into neighboring Lebanon.

Previous to joining NPR, Kuhn wrote for the Far Eastern Economic Review and freelanced for various news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times and Newsweek. He majored in French Literature as an undergraduate at Washington University in St. Louis, and later did graduate work at the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American Studies in Nanjing.

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Story Archive

People at the Seoul Railway Station in the South Korean capital watch a TV report on North Korea's missile launch on Friday, days after the U.N. Security Council adopted new sanctions against Pyongyang. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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China Steps Up Crackdown On Liberal Universities

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Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, arrives for a welcome ceremony for Tajikistan's President Emomali Rahmon in Beijing on Thursday. State media announced a key Chinese Communist Party meeting held once every five years will start on Oct. 18. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Gen. Dunford Visits Asia Amid Heightened Tensions With North Korea

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Reactions Out Of China And Guam Over Exchanges Between U.S. And North Korea

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Chinese Blockbuster 'Wolf Warrior II' Mixes Jingoism With Hollywood Heroism

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Luo Changping, left, and Deng Fei. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

China's Few Investigative Journalists Face Increasing Challenges

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An armored Chinese police van is seen next to the Friendship Bridge on the Yalu River connecting the North Korean town of Sinuiju and the Chinese city of Dandong. China is North Korea's biggest trading partner. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images

Men look at computers in an Internet bar in Beijing in 2015. Even as the government finds new methods to block virtual private networks, providers find ways to go around the blocks. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

Behind China's VPN Crackdown, A 'Game Of Cat And Mouse' Continues

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Morning News Brief: Trump In West Virginia, Chinese Trade, Usain Bolt Retires

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State Control Leaves Investigative Journalists In China Demoralized

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In a photo provided Saturday by the Shenyang Municipal Information Office, Liu Xia, center, the widow of Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo, holds a portrait of him during his funeral. She stands with Liu Hui, her younger brother (left) and Liu Xiaoxuan, the younger brother of her late husband, who is holding his cremated remains. AP hide caption

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AP

Chinese Dissident And Nobel Laureate Liu Xiaobo Dies At 61

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A chair sat empty for Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo in Oslo, Norway, in 2010. The rights activist was imprisoned in China in 2009. Heiko Junge/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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