Anthony Kuhn
Wang Zemin/N/A

Anthony Kuhn

International Correspondent, Jakarta, Indonesia

International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn official base is Jakarta, Indonesia, where he opened NPR's first bureau in that country in 2010. From there, he has covered Southeast Asia, and the gamut of natural and human diversity stretching from Myanmar to Fiji and Vietnam to Tasmania. During 2013-2014, he is covering Beijing, China, as NPR's Louisa Lim is on fellowship.

Prior to Jakarta, Kuhn spent five years based in Beijing as a NPR foreign correspondent reporting on China and Northeast Asia. In that time Kuhn covered stories including the effect of China's resurgence on rest of the world, diplomacy and the environment, the ancient cultural traditions that still exert a profound influence in today's China, and the people's quest for social justice in a period of rapid modernization and uneven development. His beat also included such diverse topics as popular theater in Japan and the New York Philharmonic's 2008 musical diplomacy tour to Pyongyang, North Korea.

In 2004-2005, Kuhn was based in London for NPR. He covered stories ranging from the 2005 terrorist attacks on London's transport system to the wedding of Prince Charles and Camilla Parker Bowles. In the spring of 2005, he reported from Iraq on the formation of the post-election interim government.

Kuhn began contributing reports to NPR from China in 1996. During that time, he also worked as an accredited freelance reporter with the Los Angeles Times, and as Beijing correspondent for the Far Eastern Economic Review.

In what felt to him a previous incarnation, Kuhn once lived on Manhattan's Lower East Side and walked down Broadway to work in Chinatown as a social worker. He majored in French literature at Washington University in St. Louis. He gravitated to China in the early 1980s, studying first at the Beijing Foreign Languages Institute and later at the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American Studies in Nanjing.

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The Chinese government-selected Panchen Lama, Gyaincain Norbu (right), took part in the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference in Beijing on March 14. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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International Tribunal Rules Against China's Claims In The South China Sea

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International Tribunal Rejects China's Claim To South China Sea

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Small fishing boats sit in the dock in Tanmen on Hainan Island. The government has subsidized the upgrading of Tanmen's fishing fleet as part of its drive to exert more control in the South China Sea. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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In A Chinese Port Town, South China Sea Dispute Is Personal

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Historic Shifts In Public Opinion Made Election Firsts Possible In Taiwan

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Hong Kong Bookseller Describes Harrowing Ordeal With Chinese Police

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University students who belong to indigenous tribes prepare for a ceremony to affirm their ethnic identity. Taiwan's aboriginal tribes arrived thousands of years before Chinese immigrants, but now account for only 2 percent of the population. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Taiwan's Aborigines Hope A New President Will Bring Better Treatment

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Chinese Billionaire Takes On Disney With His Own Theme Parks

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Taiwan Inaugurates First Female President

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Chinese lesbian couple Rui Cai (left) and Cleo Wu play with their twin babies, born last month. China does not allow same-sex marriages, and only married, heterosexual couples have access to assisted reproduction. The women went through in vitro fertilization in the U.S., and the children were born in China. Courtesy of Rui Cai and Cleo Wu hide caption

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Undaunted By China's Rule Book, Lesbian Couple Welcomes Their Newborn Twins

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Baidu, China's largest search engine, is under investigation after a college student with a rare form of cancer said it promoted a fraudulent treatment. Alexander F. Yuan/AP hide caption

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China Investigates Search Engine Baidu After Student Dies Of Cancer

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China Opens Investigation Into Search Engine Baidu After Student's Death

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Chinese officials answer questions about a new law regulating overseas nongovernmental organizations during a press conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Thursday. The new law subjects NGOs to close police supervision. "We welcome and support all foreign NGOs to come to China to conduct friendly exchanges," one official said. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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China Passes Law Putting Foreign NGOs Under Stricter Police Control

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