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David Folkenflik/NPR

NPR

David Folkenflik

Media Correspondent, Business Desk

Geraldo Rivera of Fox News has described NPR's David Folkenflik as "a really weak-kneed, backstabbing, sweaty-palmed reporter." Others have been kinder. The Columbia Journalism Review, for example, once gave him a "laurel" for reporting that immediately led the U.S. military to institute safety measures for journalists in Baghdad.

Based in New York City, Folkenflik is the media correspondent for NPR News. His stories and analyses are broadcast on the network's newsmagazines, such as All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Here & Now, and are featured on NPR's website and mobile platforms. Folkenflik's reports cast light on the stories of our age, the figures who shape journalism and the tectonic shifts affecting the news industry. He profiled the Las Vegas columnist who went bankrupt fending off a libel lawsuit from his newspaper's new owner; conducted the first interview with New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet after his appointment; and chronicled how the demands of technology have forced the press corps to change how it covers presidential primaries.

Folkenflik is the author of Murdoch's World: The Last of the Old Media Empires. The Los Angeles Times called Murdoch's World "meaty reading... laced with delicious anecdotes" and the Huffington Post described it as "the gift that keeps on giving." Folkenflik is also editor of Page One: Inside the New York Times and the Future of Journalism. His work has appeared in such publications as the Washington Post, Politico Magazine, Newsweek International, the National Post of Canada, and the Australian Financial Review. Business Insider has called Folkenflik one of the 50 most influential people in American media.

Folkenflik joined NPR in 2004 after more than a decade at the Baltimore Sun, where he covered higher education, national politics, and the media. He started his professional career at the Durham (N.C.) Herald-Sun. Folkenflik served as editor-in-chief at the Cornell Daily Sun and graduated from Cornell with a bachelor's degree in history.

A four-time winner of the Arthur Rowse Award for Press Criticism from the National Press Club, Folkenflik has received numerous other recognitions, including the inaugural 2002 Mongerson Award for Investigative Reporting on the News and top honors from the National Headliners Club and the Society of Professional Journalists. He was the first Irik Sevin Visiting Fellow at Cornell and speaks frequently across the country. He often appears as a media analyst for television and radio programs in the U.S., the U.K., Canada, Australia and Ireland. Folkenflik lives with his wife, who is the senior director for original content at Audible (wholly owned by Amazon), and children in New York City.

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Former New York Times journalist Judith Miller along with her legal team including Robert Bennett, right, leaves U.S. District Court in Washington in 2007. Miller was jailed for nearly three months after refusing to testify in a CIA leak investigation. Kevin Wolf/AP hide caption

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Kevin Wolf/AP

Julia (center) first appeared online and in printed materials as a part of Sesame Street's See Amazing in all Children initiative. She'll now appear on TV as well. From left, Elmo, Alan Muraoka, Julia, Abby Cadabby and Big Bird. Zach Hyman/Sesame Workshop hide caption

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Zach Hyman/Sesame Workshop

Julia, A Muppet With Autism, Joins The Cast Of 'Sesame Street'

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Louise Mensch, founder of the political site Heat Street and a former member of Parliament, wrote about the FBI's investigation into activities by Trump campaign figures with ties to Russia. Stefan Wemuth/WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Wemuth/WPA Pool/Getty Images

To Boost Trump Wiretap Claims, White House Leans On Unlikely Source

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"The job of the media is the accountability of government," says CNN President Jeff Zucker. "And I think we are uniquely positioned to do that with our resources and our reach." Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Turner hide caption

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Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Turner

Amid Trump Attacks And Snubs, Zucker's CNN Reclaims Newsy Mission

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Trump White House Takes Steps To Plug Leaks

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White House reporters line up Friday in Washington in hopes of attending a briefing in press secretary Sean Spicer's office. The off-camera briefing was limited mostly to pool reporters, broadcast networks and conservative-leaning outlets, with reporters for CNN, The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times and others denied entry. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Milo Yiannopoulos Resigns From Breitbart After Underage Sex Comments

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Anonymous Leaks Gain New Prominence In Trump-Era Journalism

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Then-Fox News chairman Roger Ailes with his wife Elizabeth Tilson in 2016. A New York attorney alleges Fox faces a federal probe related to sexual harassment of company employees by Ailes. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Wall Street Journal editor-in-chief Gerard Baker. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

'Wall Street Journal' Editor Defends Trump Coverage At Staff Meeting

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John Oliver speaks at Comedy Central's "Night of Too Many Stars: America Comes Together for Autism Programs" in New York in 2015. Charles Sykes/AP hide caption

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John Oliver On Facts, Donald Trump And The Supreme Court For Dogs

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The podium where Donald Trump would take the Oath of Office is covered on Jan. 19. Trump promised to govern transparently, but open-government advocates are seeing troubling early signs. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

Transparency Advocates Fear Trump Officials Will Block Flow of Information to Public

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