On an Aug. 10 tour organized by Moammar Gadhafi's governement, an unidentified man lies in a hospital bed in Tripoli. He was allegedly injured during NATO airstrikes a day earlier.

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A check point between Misrata and Beni Walid, Libya.

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Anti-Gadhafi fighters point their guns at a carpet depicting Moammar Gadhafi after taking the village of Abu Hadi, the deposed Libyan leader's birthplace, on Oct. 3. Regime loyalists who fled to the village find themselves grappling with the realities of a new nation.

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Libyans visit the destroyed Bab al-Azizia military barracks and compound of their country's ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi, in the southern suburbs of Tripoli, Libya.

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Reporter's Notebook

Gadhafi's Palace Becomes People's Market

Moammar Gadhafi's compound in the heart of Tripoli has been put to new use as a market, and the former palace of terror is now a kind of fairground.

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A revolutionary fighter watches over two suspected Gadhafi loyalists in Sirte, Libya, last month. By some estimates, up to 30 to 40 percent of Libyans are sympathetic to former dictator Moammar Gadhafi.

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David Gerbi stands in front of the main synagogue in Tripoli, Libya, on Sunday. An exiled Libyan Jew, he has returned after being away for more than 40 years. He hopes to restore the synagogue and create an atmosphere of tolerance in the aftermath of Gadhafi's ouster.

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Egyptian soldiers guard the badly damaged entrance of the Israeli Embassy in Cairo on Sunday. Protesters stormed the embassy, contributing to the worst diplomatic crisis between the two countries since they signed a peace treaty in 1979. Nasser Nasser/AP hide caption

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