Demonstrators rally to protest sexism in Brasilia, Brazil, last June. A new protest erupted last week after a study released by Brazil's Institute for Applied Economic Research reported 65 percent of Brazilians believe women who dress provocatively deserve to be attacked. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Venezuelans line up to buy goods at a store in Caracas on March 10. Protesters have been taking to the streets for weeks over the country's troubled economy and other issues. The government introduced a new foreign currency exchange system on Monday, seeking to stabilize the bolivar, which has lost much of its value against the U.S. dollar. Leo Ramirez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Short On Dollars, Venezuela Tries To Halt Black-Market Trading

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Opposition Fails To Maintain Momentum In Venezuela

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People line up to buy goods at a store in Caracas, Venezuela. LEO RAMIREZ/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Venezuela In Turmoil For Lack Of Flour, Milk And Diapers

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The Poorest In Caracas Stay Reluctant To Join Venezuelan Protests

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Demonstrators walk through a cloud of tear gas fired by the Bolivarian National Police during clashes in Caracas, Venezuela, on Wednesday. Alejandro Cegarra/AP hide caption

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Venezuela: A Month Of Unrest And Forecasts Of More

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World Cup Woes Loom For One Brazilian City

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It Wouldn't Be Carnival In Brazil Without Giant Puppets

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Colorful umbrellas long ago replaced concealed knives during frevo parades. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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From Recife, Brazil, 3 Rhythms Get The Carnival Party Started

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Maria Victoria Agostinho, 5, walks outside her home in the Vila Autodromo area of Rio. Her family is slated for eviction, along with others in the area, to make way for building projects related to the 2016 Summer Olympics. Lianne Milton for NPR hide caption

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As Brazil Gears Up For Olympics, Some Poor Families Get Moved Out

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The ground outside Sao Paulo is cracked and dry. It was the hottest January on record in parts of Brazil, and the heat plus a severe drought has fanned fears of water shortages and crop damage. Nacho Doce/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Drought Could Drain More Than Brazil's Coffee Crop

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Local authorities celebrate a demolition explosion that's part of Rio's Porto Maravilha urbanization project, in Rio de Janeiro, on Nov. 24, 2013. The state- and federal-supported project is part of the city's redevelopment ahead of the 2016 Summer Olympic Games. Pilar Olivares/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Olympics Set To Transform Rio — But For Better Or Worse?

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Viviane Araujo, a Salguiero samba school queen, performs at a rehearsal for Carnival in Rio de Janeiro. Marcello da Cunha Freire, vice president of the popular samba school, was murdered last month in a drive-by shooting. Lianne Milton for NPR hide caption

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Samba School Murder Exposes The Dark Side Of Rio's Carnival

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