Brazil Tramples Poor Citizens In Its Rush To Glory

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Construction is underway on the Itaquerao stadium in Sao Paulo, shown here June 12. The stadium will be the venue for the opening ceremony and game of the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil, and many migrants are among the laborers working on the project. Sebastiao Moreira/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Amid Construction Boom, Migrants Flow Into Brazil

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In Light Of Protests, Brazil Offers Changes

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Protests Allow Brazilians To Feel Part Of Global Movement

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Indigenous leaders from Brazil's Terena tribe attend a meeting with government officials in the capital, Brasilia, on June 6. Brazil's Indians have been demanding greater land rights and are increasingly coming into conflict with large ranchers and farmers. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Brazil's Indians Reclaim Land, Citing Promises, Using Force

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Lourdes Garcia-Navarro Reports For Morning Edition

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Protesters In Brazil Claim Victory, Fare Hikes Rescinded

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Brazilian Leaders Take Conciliatory Tone Toward Protesters

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A mass protest in Sao Paulo on Monday night was one of several across the country where demonstrators raised a host of grievances. Some demonstrators said they drew their inspiration from the protests in Turkey. Nelson Antoine/AP hide caption

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Angry At Brazil's Government, Protesters Take To The Streets

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Residents socialize and children play in the tranquil plaza of Mage, a small town that has seen an increase in violence as pacification efforts in Rio de Janeiro are forcing drug traffickers out of the capital's favelas, or shantytowns. Lianne Milton for NPR hide caption

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Criminals Fleeing Rio Crackdown Set Up Shop In The Suburbs

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Robert Laurindo recently opened Casa da Tapioca in favela Vidigal, in Rio de Janeiro. He purchased a two-level, one-bedroom building, which includes the cafe on the ground floor. Here, he serves his grandmother's tapioca recipes to Elizangela Ferreiro, right, and her daughter, Jessica da Silva, originally from Sao Paulo, who recently moved to Vidigal. Lianne Milton for NPR hide caption

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Once Unsafe, Rio's Shantytowns See Rapid Gentrification

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Rio's Operations Center brings together more than 30 agencies and allows them to coordinate on daily issues such as traffic, as well as on emergencies such as the frequent flash floods in hillside slums. Raphael Lima/Courtesy of the Operations Center, City of Rio De Janeiro hide caption

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Rio Goes High-Tech, With An Eye Toward Olympics, World Cup

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Cassia Mendes, who has worked as a housekeeper for more than 20 years, cleans a house in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on Feb. 19, 2012. Brazil enacted on April 2 a constitutional amendment to grant domestic workers health insurance and other benefits. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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'We Are Not Valued': Brazil's Domestic Workers Seek Rights

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