Lulu Garcia-Navarro
Dario Lopez Mills/N/A

Lulu Garcia-Navarro

South America Correspondent

Lulu Garcia-Navarro is an NPR international correspondent covering South America for NPR. She is based in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Previously, she served a NPR's correspondent based in Israel, reporting on stories happening throughout the Middle East. She was one of the first reporters to enter Libya after the 2011 Arab Spring uprising began and spent months painting a deep and vivid portrait of a country at war. Often at great personal risk, Garcia-Navarro captured history in the making with stunning insight, courage and humanity.

For her work covering the Arab Spring, Garcia-Navarro was awarded a 2011 George Foster Peabody Award, a Lowell Thomas Award from the Overseas Press Club, and an Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the Alliance for Women and the Media's Gracie Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement.

Before her assignment to Jerusalem began in 2009, Garcia-Navarro served for more than a year as NPR News' Baghdad Bureau Chief and before that three years as NPR's foreign correspondent in Mexico City, reporting from that region as well as on special assignments abroad.

Garcia-Navarro got her start in journalism as a freelancer with the BBC World Service and Voice of America, reporting from Cuba, Syria, Panama and Europe. She later became a producer for Associated Press Television News before transitioning to AP Radio. While there, Garcia-Navarro covered post-Sept. 11 events in Afghanistan and developments in Jerusalem. In 2002, she began a two-year reporting stint based in Iraq.

In addition to the Murrow award, Garcia-Navarro was honored with the 2006 Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for a two-part series "Migrants' Job Search Empties Mexican Community." She contributed to NPR News reporting on Iraq, which was recognized with a 2005 Peabody Award and a 2007 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton.

Garcia-Navarro holds a Bachelor of Science degree in International Relations from Georgetown University and an Master of Arts degree in journalism from City University in London. Lourdes is married to Times of London journalist James Hider. They have a daughter and they sometimes travel together for work and always for play.

Highlights from Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

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People line up outside the Venezuelan National Electoral Council in Caracas, the capital, on Monday. They were confirming their signatures supporting a recall referendum against President Nicolas Maduro. The country is suffering skyrocketing inflation and chronic shortages of basic goods. Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

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Brazil's Olympic Torch Relay Goes Well Until Jaguar Is Shot And Killed

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Cleaners in Rio de Janeiro collect debris from Guanabara Bay that washed up onto the beach last December. The bay, which will host sailing events at the Olympics in August, is heavily polluted. Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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For Olympic Sailors And Fishermen Alike, Rio's Dirty Bay Sets Off Alarms

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IOC President Tours Rio Venues, Confident Olympics Will Be Great

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Yolande Mabika, a refugee and judo athlete from the Democratic Republic of Congo, stands outside her newly rented apartment in Rio de Janeiro. Mabika and fellow Congolese athlete Popole Misenga came to Brazil in 2013 to compete in a judo championship; they became refugees after their coach vanished with their passports and money. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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For The First Time, A Team Of Refugees Will Compete At The Olympics

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A man performs yoga in the Babilonia favela overlooking Rio de Janeiro in 2014. The Brazilian government made a big push to impose order on the shantytowns in advance of the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics this summer. Babilonia was once considered a model, but violence has been on the rise in the run-up to the games. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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As Olympics Near, Violence Grips Rio's 'Pacified' Favelas

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Key Minister In Brazil's New Government Steps Down After Tape Is Leaked

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Brazil's new finance minister Henrique Meirelles (left) and acting President Michel Temer gesture during the Cabinet inauguration ceremony in Brazil's capital Brasilia, on Thursday. Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff was suspended earlier to face an impeachment trial. Andressa Anholete/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brazil's Senate Votes To Remove President Dilma Rousseff From Office

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Brazil's Senate Suspends President Rouseff From Office

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Brazil's Senate To Vote On Impeachment Of President Dilma Rousseff

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Protesters last month vent their anger over President Dilma Rousseff (left) moving to appoint her predecessor, Luis Inacio Lula da Silva, as her chief of staff — an action that would have shielded him from prosecution. A court blocked him from the post. Rousseff faces the possibility of impeachment while Lula is under investigation for corruption. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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With The Economy Crashing, Brazilians Turn On A Once-Popular President

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Brazil's President Is One Step Closer To Being Impeached

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