Lulu Garcia-Navarro
Dario Lopez Mills/N/A

Lulu Garcia-Navarro

South America Correspondent

Lulu Garcia-Navarro is an NPR international correspondent covering South America for NPR. She is based in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Previously, she served a NPR's correspondent based in Israel, reporting on stories happening throughout the Middle East. She was one of the first reporters to enter Libya after the 2011 Arab Spring uprising began and spent months painting a deep and vivid portrait of a country at war. Often at great personal risk, Garcia-Navarro captured history in the making with stunning insight, courage and humanity.

For her work covering the Arab Spring, Garcia-Navarro was awarded a 2011 George Foster Peabody Award, a Lowell Thomas Award from the Overseas Press Club, and an Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the Alliance for Women and the Media's Gracie Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement.

Before her assignment to Jerusalem began in 2009, Garcia-Navarro served for more than a year as NPR News' Baghdad Bureau Chief and before that three years as NPR's foreign correspondent in Mexico City, reporting from that region as well as on special assignments abroad.

Garcia-Navarro got her start in journalism as a freelancer with the BBC World Service and Voice of America, reporting from Cuba, Syria, Panama and Europe. She later became a producer for Associated Press Television News before transitioning to AP Radio. While there, Garcia-Navarro covered post-Sept. 11 events in Afghanistan and developments in Jerusalem. In 2002, she began a two-year reporting stint based in Iraq.

In addition to the Murrow award, Garcia-Navarro was honored with the 2006 Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for a two-part series "Migrants' Job Search Empties Mexican Community." She contributed to NPR News reporting on Iraq, which was recognized with a 2005 Peabody Award and a 2007 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton.

Garcia-Navarro holds a Bachelor of Science degree in International Relations from Georgetown University and an Master of Arts degree in journalism from City University in London. Lourdes is married to Times of London journalist James Hider. They have a daughter and they sometimes travel together for work and always for play.

Highlights from Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

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Key Minister In Brazil's New Government Steps Down After Tape Is Leaked
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Brazil's new finance minister Henrique Meirelles (left) and acting President Michel Temer gesture during the Cabinet inauguration ceremony in Brazil's capital Brasilia, on Thursday. Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff was suspended earlier to face an impeachment trial. Andressa Anholete/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brazil's Senate Votes To Remove President Dilma Rousseff From Office
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Brazil's Senate Suspends President Rouseff From Office
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Brazil's Senate To Vote On Impeachment Of President Dilma Rousseff
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Protesters last month vent their anger over President Dilma Rousseff (left) moving to appoint her predecessor, Luis Inacio Lula da Silva, as her chief of staff — an action that would have shielded him from prosecution. A court blocked him from the post. Rousseff faces the possibility of impeachment while Lula is under investigation for corruption. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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With The Economy Crashing, Brazilians Turn On A Once-Popular President
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Brazil's President Is One Step Closer To Being Impeached
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Two-month-old Lara, who was born with microcephaly, is examined by a neurologist at the Pedro I hospital in Campina Grande, Paraiba state, Brazil, on Feb. 12. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Brazilian Doctor Crafts System Hailed As 'Way Forward' For Combating Zika
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Nadja Bezerra carries her 4-month-old daughter, Alice, who was born with microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil. Dado Galdieri/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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How To Fight Zika When Your Country Is In Trouble: Improvise
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CDC Team Scoured Hard-Hit Northern Brazil For Clues To Zika Virus
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A woman places flowers on a coffin during a protest against violence in Rio de Janeiro last October. Brazil's violence is at an all-time high, with nearly 60,000 murders a year. Silvia Izquierdo/AP hide caption

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Brazil Has Nearly 60,000 Murders, And It May Relax Gun Laws
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Both President Dilma Rousseff and former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, shown here during his swearing-in ceremony as the chief of staff March 17, have been caught up in the wiretap firestorm. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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In Brazilian Officials' Taped Conversations, Women Hear Rampant Sexism
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