Alina Selyukh

Reporter, All Tech Considered

Alina Selyukh is a technology reporter at NPR and host of the All Tech Considered blog, where she writes and edits stories about digital culture and how technology is changing the way we interact with each other and the world around us.

Before joining NPR in October 2015, Selyukh spent five years at Reuters, where she covered tech, telecom and cybersecurity policy, campaign finance during the 2012 election cycle, health care policy and the Food and Drug Administration, and a bit of financial markets and IPOs.

Selyukh began her career in journalism at age 13, freelancing for a local television station and several newspapers in her home town of Samara in Russia. She has since reported for CNN in Moscow, ABC News in Nebraska and NationalJournal.com in Washington, D.C. At her alma mater, Selyukh also helped in the production of a documentary for NET Television, Nebraska's PBS station.

She received a bachelor's degree in broadcasting, news-editorial and political science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Peter Thiel, head of Clarium Capital Management and founding investor in PayPal and Facebook, speaks at a conference in San Francisco on April 12. Noah Berger/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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This 2005 silicon wafer with Pentium 4 processors was signed by Gordon Moore for the 40th anniversary of Moore’'s law. Science & Society Picture Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Yahoo Chief Information Security Officer Bob Lord on encryption: "Yes, it's used by terrorists. It's also used by people who are looking to voice their opinions on issues and to save lives." Yahoo hide caption

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FBI Director James Comey testifies March 1 before the House Judiciary Committee on the encryption of the iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino attackers. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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How Much Money Do Uber Drivers Really Make? Send Us Your Screenshots
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Phone, Everlasting: What If Your Smartphone Never Got Old?
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FBI Executive Assistant Director for Science and Technology Amy Hess (from left) testifies on encryption Tuesday before a House panel, alongside the New York City Police Department's Thomas Galati and Indiana State Police Office Capt. Charles Cohen. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Nigel Bradham of the Buffalo Bills celebrates a touchdown in the October game against Jacksonville Jaguars in London. Yahoo's online stream of the event was one of the NFL's digital tests. Alan Crowhurst/Getty Images hide caption

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The Federal Communications Commission voted to propose its first Internet privacy rules and to expand a phone subsidy program to cover Internet access. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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