Alina Selyukh 2016 Stephen Voss/NPR hide caption

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Stephen Voss/NPR

Alina Selyukh

Reporter, All Tech Considered

Alina Selyukh is a technology reporter at NPR and host of the All Tech Considered blog, where she writes and edits stories about digital culture and how technology is changing the way we interact with each other and the world around us.

Before joining NPR in October 2015, Selyukh spent five years at Reuters, where she covered tech, telecom and cybersecurity policy, campaign finance during the 2012 election cycle, health care policy and the Food and Drug Administration, and a bit of financial markets and IPOs.

Selyukh began her career in journalism at age 13, freelancing for a local television station and several newspapers in her home town of Samara in Russia. She has since reported for CNN in Moscow, ABC News in Nebraska, and NationalJournal.com in Washington, D.C. At her alma mater, Selyukh also helped in the production of a documentary for NET Television, Nebraska's PBS station.

She received a bachelor's degree in broadcasting, news-editorial and political science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Ajit Pai Starts To Roll Back Latest Internet Regulations From Obama's Team

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The Office of Government Ethics website was down on Thursday, after White House counselor Kellyanne Conway urged people to buy Ivanka Trump's products, potentially violating federal ethics rules. Office of Government Ethics/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Office of Government Ethics/Screenshot by NPR

Ajit Pai, the senior Republican at the Federal Communications Commission, is slated to be the agency's new chairman. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Walter Shaub Jr., who heads the U.S. Office of Government Ethics, has been under attack for his tweets and statements about President-elect Donald Trump's conflicts of interest. U.S. Office of Government Ethics hide caption

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U.S. Office of Government Ethics

In U.S. Ethics Chief, An Unlikely Gadfly To Trump

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A user in Beijing looks at The New York Times app on an iPhone. Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images

Apple Pulls 'The New York Times' From Its App Store In China

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What 2017 Holds For Technology News

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Walter Shaub Jr. is the director of the U.S. Office of Government Ethics, which tweeted last month about President-elect Donald Trump's conflicts of interest. U.S. Office of Government Ethics hide caption

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U.S. Office of Government Ethics

U.S. Ethics Chief Was Behind Those Tweets About Trump, Records Show

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Amazon's personal assistant device Echo, powered by the voice recognition program Alexa, is one of the most popular gifts this holiday season. Luke MacGregor/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Luke MacGregor/Bloomberg/Getty Images

As We Leave More Digital Tracks, Amazon Echo Factors In Murder Investigation

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

Why Aren't There More Women In Tech? A Tour Of Silicon Valley's Leaky Pipeline

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AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson (left) and Time Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes are sworn in Wednesday before testifying at a Senate committee hearing on the proposed merger of their companies. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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