Alina Selyukh Alina Selyukh is a technology reporter at NPR and host of the All Tech Considered blog.

Alina Selyukh 2016 Stephen Voss/NPR hide caption

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Stephen Voss/NPR

Alina Selyukh

Reporter, All Tech Considered

Alina Selyukh is a technology reporter at NPR and host of the All Tech Considered blog, where she writes and edits stories about digital culture and how technology is changing the way we interact with each other and the world around us.

Before joining NPR in October 2015, Selyukh spent five years at Reuters, where she covered tech, telecom and cybersecurity policy, campaign finance during the 2012 election cycle, health care policy and the Food and Drug Administration, and a bit of financial markets and IPOs.

Selyukh began her career in journalism at age 13, freelancing for a local television station and several newspapers in her home town of Samara in Russia. She has since reported for CNN in Moscow, ABC News in Nebraska, and NationalJournal.com in Washington, D.C. At her alma mater, Selyukh also helped in the production of a documentary for NET Television, Nebraska's PBS station.

She received a bachelor's degree in broadcasting, news-editorial and political science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Internet Companies Plan Day Of Action In Support Of Net Neutrality

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The Federal Communications Commission is accepting public comment on its proposal to loosen the "net neutrality" rules placed on Internet providers in 2015. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Internet Companies Plan Online Campaign To Keep Net Neutrality Rules

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Telemarketers are prohibited from making prerecorded phone calls to people without prior consent. It's also illegal to deliberately falsify caller ID with the intent to harm or defraud consumers. PeopleImages/Getty Images/iStock hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images/iStock

The Blue Alert, a new kind of public emergency notification was named after two New York Police Department officers, Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Liu, who were killed in an ambush attack by a man who hours earlier had shot a woman near Baltimore. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Uber co-founder Travis Kalanick, pictured here at a Vanity Fair summit in October 2016, resigned abruptly this week as the company's CEO after weeks of scandals about workplace culture. Mike Windle/Getty Images for Vanity Fair hide caption

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Mike Windle/Getty Images for Vanity Fair

After CEO Resignation, Is Uber Kalanick-less Or Kalanick-free?

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Amazon Announces Plan To Buy Whole Foods For $13.7 Billion

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Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer, seen in 2014, wrote a farewell post to employees titled "Nostalgia, Gratitude & Optimism." She signed off with: "Yaho-o-oo! Marissa." Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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Julie Jacobson/AP

The Gab.ai home page cites the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Gab.ai/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Gab.ai/Screenshot by NPR

Feeling Sidelined By Mainstream Social Media, Far-Right Users Jump To Gab

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In this photo dated Aug. 23, 2010, Iranian technicians work at the Bushehr nuclear power plant, where Iran had confirmed several personal laptops infected by Stuxnet malware. Ebrahim Norouzi/AP/International Iran Photo Agency hide caption

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Ebrahim Norouzi/AP/International Iran Photo Agency

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai has started the process to roll back Obama-era regulations for Internet service providers. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Emily Bogle/NPR

FCC Chief Makes Case For Tackling Net Neutrality Violations 'After The Fact'

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A Primer On The Future Of Net Neutrality Under Trump

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