Sarah McCammon Sarah McCammon is a National Desk reporter with NPR News.
Kara Frame/NPR
Sarah McCammon
Kara Frame/NPR

Sarah McCammon

Reporter

Sarah McCammon is a reporter covering the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast for NPR's National Desk. During the 2016 election cycle, she was NPR's lead political reporter assigned to the Donald Trump campaign. In that capacity, she was a regular on the NPR Politics Podcast and reported on the GOP primary, the rise of the Trump movement, divisions within the Republican Party over the future of the GOP and the role of religion in those debates; that work earned her a rare invitation inside a closed-door meeting between evangelical leaders and Trump soon after he clinched the nomination.

In addition to politics, McCammon has a special interest in science and health journalism and frequently reports on abortion and reproductive health in her current role.

Prior to joining NPR in 2015, McCammon reported for NPR member stations in Georgia, Iowa, and Nebraska, where she often hosted news magazines and talk shows. She's covered debates over oil pipelines in the Southeast and Midwest, agriculture and environmental issues in Nebraska, the rollout of the Affordable Care Act in Iowa, and coastal environmental issues in Georgia.

McCammon began her journalism career as a newspaper reporter. She traces her interest in news back to childhood, when she would watch Sunday morning roundtable shows – recorded on the VCR during church – with her father on Sunday afternoons. In 1998, she spent a semester serving as a U.S. Senate Page. She's received numerous regional and national journalism awards, including the Atlanta Press Club's "Excellence in Broadcast Radio Reporting" honor in 2015.

McCammon is a native of Kansas City, Mo., and a proud Midwesterner. She spent a semester studying at Oxford University in the U.K. while completing her undergraduate degree at Trinity College near Chicago.

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Story Archive

The upstairs porch of Anne Blessing's home in Charleston, S.C., has been a stop on a popular historic home tour. For the first time, visitors will tour the kitchen where enslaved people once spent most of their lives toiling over hot fires. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Looking 'Beyond The Big House' And Into The Lives Of Slaves

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Abortion rights opponents gather during a rally in downtown Louisville earlier this summer. A federal judge issued an order to keep protesters away from a "buffer zone" outside the EMW Women's Surgical Center. Dylan Lovan/AP hide caption

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Dylan Lovan/AP

There's been a lot of public and private investment in Kansas City's downtown since the 1990s. Sarah McCammon /NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon /NPR

As Kansas City Booms And Sprawls, Trying Not To Forget Those In Between

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In the U.S., the average age for initiating sexual activity has remained around 17 or 18 since the early 1990s, even as people have begun marrying later in life. PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images

President Trump poses with Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr., during commencement at Liberty University May 13 in Lynchburg, Va. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Some Liberty University Grads Are Returning Their Diplomas To Protest Trump

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Charlottesville Looks To Move Forward From Violent Protests

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Flowers and other mementos are left at a makeshift memorial for the victims of Saturday's violence in Charlottesville, Va. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

In Charlottesville, Religious Leaders Try To Comfort Residents

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Virginia Congregations Condemn White Supremacy After Violent Demonstrations

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As Democrats Look To 2018, Abortion Emerges Divisive

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Tara Lang was pregnant with her daughter when her fiance was killed in a motorcycle crash. A pregnancy center in Metairie, La., helped her sign up for Medicaid coverage. Jessica Rosgaard/WWNO hide caption

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How Crisis Pregnancy Center Clients Rely On Medicaid

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Activist Bree Newsome scaled a flagpole and removed the Confederate flag from a monument at the Statehouse in Columbia, S.C., following a deadly shooting at a historically black church in Charleston. The flag was officially removed from the grounds days later on July 10. Bruce Smith/AP hide caption

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Bruce Smith/AP

2 Years After S.C.'s Flag Came Down, Cities Grapple With Confederate Symbols

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A lightning strike caused a wildfire that consumed more than 6,500 acres in the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge in August 2011. Swamp fires like this often burn for months because of the dry peat soil. Greg Sanders/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hide caption

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After Centuries Of Draining This Swamp, The Government Now Wants To Save It

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Health Care Questions Enter Virginia Governor's Race

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