Bonny Wolf
N/A

Bonny Wolf

Commentator, Weekend Edition Sunday

NPR commentator Bonny Wolf grew up in Minnesota and has worked as a reporter and editor at newspapers in New Jersey and Texas. She taught journalism at Texas A&M University where she encouraged her student, Lyle Lovett, to give up music and get a real job. Wolf gives better advice about cooking and eating, and contributes her monthly food essay to NPR's award-winning Weekend Edition Sunday. She is also a contributing editor to "Kitchen Window," NPR's Web-only, weekly food column.

Wolf 's commentaries are not just about what people eat, but why: for comfort, nurturance, and companionship; to mark the seasons and to celebrate important events; to connect with family and friends and with ancestors they never knew; and, of course, for love. In a Valentine's Day essay, for example, Wolf writes that nearly every food from artichoke to zucchini has been considered an aphrodisiac.

Wolf, whose Web site is www.bonnywolf.com, has been a newspaper food editor and writer, restaurant critic, and food newsletter publisher, and served as chief speechwriter to Secretaries of Agriculture Mike Espy and Dan Glickman.

Bonny Wolf's book of food essays, Talking with My Mouth Full, will be published in November by St. Martin's Press. She lives, writes, eats and cooks in Washington, D.C.

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Ingredients at a Sweetgreen restaurant in Washington, D.C. Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Vegetables Likely To Take More Of Your Plate In 2016

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Stephanie Deutsch's mother hailed from Long Island where she grew up eating oyster stuffing. Her father was from Texas and loved this cornbread stuffing, which the family continues to make. Courtesy of David S. Deutsch hide caption

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Courtesy of David S. Deutsch

Don't Mess With My Stuffing: Thanksgiving's Most Hotly Debated Dish

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Is It Time To Write Off Restaurant Tipping?

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Potato swirls at 626 Night Market in Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, Calif. Brian Fung/Courtesy of 626 Night Market hide caption

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Brian Fung/Courtesy of 626 Night Market

Nocturnal Nosh: Americans Get A Taste Of Night Markets

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Kale and Brussels sprouts got together and conceived a new vegetable, kalette. Look for it on menus in 2015. Rain Rabbit/Flickr hide caption

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Rain Rabbit/Flickr

A Cuppa Matcha With Your Crickets? On The Menu In 2015

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Asian carp, battered and fried. As the fish makes its unwelcome way up the Mississippi River, chefs are trying to get people to eat to beat it back. Louisiana Sea Grant/Flickr hide caption

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Louisiana Sea Grant/Flickr

Fighting (Tasty) Invasive Fish With Forks And Knives

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Driver Rick Galloway of South Mountain Creamery delivers milk in Liberty Town, Md., in 2004. Today the company has 8,500 home delivery accounts in five states. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Milkman's Comeback Means Dairy At The Door And More

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Tea leaves will be big in entrees and desserts in 2014. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Eating Tea And Other Food Predictions For 2014

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Mallomars: The Cookie Everyone Likes To Hoard

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A woman checks out a smart refrigerator at a consumer electronics show in 2012. Samsung USA hide caption

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Samsung USA

Kitchens Of The Future Will Really Know How To Cook

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Kimchi is a traditional pungent fermented Korean dish made of vegetables with a variety of seasonings. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Why You Shouldn't Wrinkle Your Nose At Fermentation

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Along the East Coast, wild oysters have been disappearing, but the number of farm-raised oysters is exploding. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Oysters Rebound In Popularity With Man-Made Bounty

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