The plate on the left contains about equal numbers of colonies of two different bacteria. After the bacteria compete and evolve, the lighter ones have taken the lead in the plate on the right. Courtesy of Michael Wiser hide caption

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Bacterial Competition In Lab Shows Evolution Never Stops

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A dog burial in Greene County, Ill. This fossil dates back to about 8,500 years ago. Courtesy of Del Baston, Center for American Archaeology hide caption

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Old Dogs, New Data: Canines May Have Been Domesticated In Europe

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This is an artist's illustration of Kepler-62f, a planet in the "habitable zone" of a star that is slightly smaller and cooler than ours. Kepler-62f is roughly 40 percent larger than Earth. NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle hide caption

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Galaxy Quest: Just How Many Earth-Like Planets Are Out There?

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Friend Or Foe? Scientists say dogs react differently to the direction of another dog's tail wag. Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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The Tail's The Tell: Dog Wags Can Mean Friend Or Foe

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The botulism toxin comes from Clostridium botulinum bacteria, seen here in a colorized micrograph. James Cavallini/Science Source hide caption

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Why Scientists Held Back Details On A Unique Botulinum Toxin

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The Chalet (right) is the U.S. Antarctic Program's administrations and operations center at McMurdo Station. Reed Scherer/National Science Foundation hide caption

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Shutdown Forces Antarctic Research Into 'Caretaker Status'

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A helicopter is unloaded from an LC-130 in Antarctica last December. Researchers on this mission were studying the Pine Island Glacier, one of the fastest-receding glaciers on the continent. August Allen/National Science Foundation hide caption

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Even Antarctica Feels Effects Of The Government Shutdown

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Would time spent with Anton Chekov, famed for his subtle, flawed characters, make you a better judge of human nature? Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Want To Read Others' Thoughts? Try Reading Literary Fiction

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The Clinical Center at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. National Institutes of Health hide caption

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From Therapy Dogs To New Patients, Federal Shutdown Hits NIH

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A worker stands on top of a storage bin on July 27, 2011, at a drilling operation in Claysville, Pa. The dust is from powder mixed with water for hydraulic fracturing. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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Sand From Fracking Could Pose Lung Disease Risk To Workers

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NASA Says Ancient Mars Could Have Supported Life

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Space tourist Dennis Tito celebrates after his landing near the Kazakh town of Arkalyk on May 6, 2001. Alexander Nemenov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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First Space Tourist Sets Sights On A Mars Mission

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Health officials around the world are on constant lookout for the deadly bird flu. Here a worker collects chickens on a farm in Kathamndu, Nepal, where the virus was suspected of infecting poultry last October. Prakas Mathema/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Feds Set New Rules For Controversial Bird Flu Research

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Highly Anticipated Asteroid Upstaged, By A Meteor

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This computer image from a NASA video shows the small asteroid 2012 DA14 on its path as it passes by Earth on Feb. 15. NASA hide caption

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Close Shave: Asteroid To Buzz Earth Next Week

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