This illustration shows the asteroid 24 Themis flanked by two small fragments that broke off following a crash more than 1 billion years ago. The bottom fragment's cometlike tail comes from the sublimation of ice from its surface. Gabriel Perez, Servicio MultiMedia, Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife, Spain hide caption

toggle caption Gabriel Perez, Servicio MultiMedia, Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife, Spain

Frosty Asteroid May Give Clues About Earth's Oceans

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This newly released image from Hubble shows scorching radiation and fast winds from super-hot newborn stars are shaping this pillar of gas and dust. This stellar nursery is called the Carina Nebula and located 7,500 light-years away. NASA hide caption

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Space Community Reacts To Obama's Plans

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Administration To Outline Revamped Space Policy

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In the study, miniature GPS loggers weighing just 16 grams were fitted into custom-made backpacks carried by flocks of up to 10 homing pigeons. Courtesy of Zsuzsa Akos hide caption

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Backpacked Birds Reveal Who's The Boss

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The crew of the space shuttle Discovery is set to launch Monday morning. Where will they go after the mission ends? John Raoux/AP hide caption

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Without Shuttles, Astronauts' Careers May Stall

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A magnified view of a colony of embryonic stem cells from the H9 stem cell line, one of the few lines approved for federally funded research under the Bush administration. These cells are now off-limits under a new policy set up by President Obama. Public Domain, via Wikimedia hide caption

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Obama Policy Shelves Most Bush-Era Stem Cell Lines

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The byssal threads help these mussels hang on to rocky outcroppings and might suggest a new way of making flexible but strong materials for industrial uses. jeffk/via flickr hide caption

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Mighty Mussels Have Industrial Strength

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The development of NASA’s Ares I-X rocket would be halted if President Obama's budget for the space agency is approved. NASA/Kim Shiflett hide caption

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Lawmakers Say New NASA Plan Lacks Direction

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An artist's rendering of the 70-million-year-old fish Bonnerichthys. This large bony fish got its dinner much like today's whales, by slurping in water and filtering out tiny sea creatures. Image courtesy of Robert Nicholls, www.paleocreations.com hide caption

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Prehistoric Megafish Ate Ocean's Tiniest Critters

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Cell Phone Data: Can You Track Me Now?

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Taken in 1990 by NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft, the "pale blue dot" photo shows what our planet looks like from 4 billion miles away. Earth is the tiny speck of light indicated by the arrow and enlarged in the upper left-hand corner. The pale streak over Earth is an artifact of sunlight scattering in the camera's optics. NASA/JPL hide caption

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An Alien View Of Earth

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An artist's rendition of the International Space Station with the addition of the new viewing module, called the cupola. Courtesy of NASA hide caption

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Forget Portholes, Space Station Gets 360-Degree View

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