Doby Photography /NPR
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

Prior to NPR, Greenfieldboyce spent a decade working in print, mostly magazines including U.S. News & World Report and New Scientist.

A graduate of Johns Hopkins, earning her Bachelor's of Arts degree in social sciences and a Master's of Arts degree in science writing, Greenfieldboyce taught science writing for four years at the university. She was honored for her talents with the Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award for Young Science Journalists.

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Story Archive

A plasticine caterpillar glistens with moisture while awaiting potential predator attacks in the forest of Tai Po Kau, Hong Kong. Chung Yun Tak/Science hide caption

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Chung Yun Tak/Science

Scientists Glued Fake Caterpillars On Plants Worldwide. Here's What Happened

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Tyrannosaurus rex jaws generated 8,000-pound bite forces and let the creature eat everything from duck-billed dinosaurs to triceratops. Scientific Reports hide caption

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Scientific Reports

Tyrannosaurus Rex's Bite Force Measured 8,000 Pounds, Scientists Say

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A Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Police officer wears a camera during a news conference in 2014. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Scientists Hunt Hard Evidence On How Cop Cameras Affect Behavior

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A mother and calf humpback whale swim in the Exmouth Gulf in Western Australia. Fredrik Christiansen/Functional Ecology hide caption

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Fredrik Christiansen/Functional Ecology

Recordings Reveal That Baby Humpback Whales 'Whisper' To Their Mothers

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Out Of The Lab And Into The Streets, Science Community Marches For Science

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This wounded ant (Megaponera analis), with two termites clinging to it, is alive but likely too exhausted after battle to get back to the nest without help. Frank et al./Science Advances hide caption

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Frank et al./Science Advances

No Ant Left Behind: Warrior Ants Carry Injured Comrades Home

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Spraying sea salt into the atmosphere to increase the reflective cloud cover over oceans is the way some scientists think they might be able to bring down Earth's temperature. At least they'd like to safely test the idea on a small scale. Pixza/Getty Images hide caption

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Pixza/Getty Images

Scientists Who Want To Study Climate Engineering Shun Trump

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The American Iron and Steel Institute is one of the trade groups that wants Congress to undo the stronger safety regulation enacted in 2016 by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. michal-rojek/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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michal-rojek/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Congress May Undo Rule That Pushes Firms To Keep Good Safety Records

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NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 monitors how the climate is changing. Trump's budget would eliminate some satellites, including OCO-3, a next-generation carbon-monitoring spacecraft. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Trump's Budget Slashes Climate Change Funding

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An 18th-century etching by artist John Kay depicts the extra tall Charles Byrne, the extra short George Cranstoun and three contemporaries of more conventional height. Byrne made his living as a professional spectacle and died at age 22 in 1783. Wellcome Library, London/Wellcome Images hide caption

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Wellcome Library, London/Wellcome Images

The Saga Of The Irish Giant's Bones Dismays Medical Ethicists

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SpaceX Moves To Launch First-Ever Private Mission To The Moon

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Scientists rallied for evidence-based public policy outside the American Geophysical Union's fall meeting in San Francisco in December. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Should Scientists March? U.S. Researchers Still Debating Pros And Cons

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This artist's rendering shows what one of the seven planets, TRAPPIST-1f, might look like. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Astronomers Find 7 Earth-Size Planets Around A Nearby Star

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The Apollo 11 command module Columbia sits in the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar in Virginia, where it is undergoing conservation. Dane Penland/National Air and Space Museum/Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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Dane Penland/National Air and Space Museum/Smithsonian Institution